Heading 3

Drag Strip List

A Comprehensive Encyclopedia

HOME
LOCATION
MEMORIES
ABOUT
CONTACT

SOUTH CAROLINA

125171013
Greer Dragway (1954)
Starlite 25 Drag Strip/Ware Shoals Dragway (1955)
Chester Drag Strip (1956)
Bennettsville "Drag Strip" (1957)
Darlington County Airport (Dovesville) (1957)
Jackson Drag Strip/Carolina Dragway (1957)
Greenville-Pickens Speedway (1959)
Newberry Fairgrounds Speedway (1959)
Palmetto Drag Strip (Pelion) (1959)
Piedmont Interstate Fairgrounds (Spartanburg) (1959)
Rambi Raceway (Myrtle Beach) (1959)
Walterboro "Drag Strip" (1959)
Orangeburg Drag Strip (Neeses) (1961)
Blaney Drag Strip (Elgin) (1962)
Mid-Carolina Drag Strip (Batesburg) (1962)
Darlington Quarter Drag Strip/Florence-Darlington Drag Strip (1964)
Spartanburg Dragway (Roebuck) (1964)
Donaldson Air Force Base (Greenville) (1965)
Myrtle Beach International Dragway (1966)
Camden Drag Strip (1960s)
Pageland Drag Strip (1960s)
Darlington International Dragway (1973)
Cooper River Dragway/Lowcountry Dragway (Moncks Corner) (1977)
Midway Dragstrip/Dragway (Greeleyville) (1999)
Blaney Drag Strip. Photograph by Keith McGraw

Bennettsville "Drag Strip"

  • Years of Operation: 1957
  • Status:  Exact location unknown

Alan Weddle, from Burlington, North Carolina, was the first person to go over 100 MPH at the drag strip at Bennettsville. He won top eliminator at a race in October 1957, clocking 103.44 MPH. The specific location of the strip is not known, although racing may have taken place at the county airport west of town (now called Marlboro County Airport). More research is needed.
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map

Blaney Drag Strip (Elgin)

  • Years of Operation:   ca. 1962-ca. 1983?
  • Status:  2

Hazel Mayers Smith filed incorporation papers for this strip on June 19, 1962. Located twenty miles north of Columbia in Elgin, it became an NHRA-sanctioned track by March 1969. Ed Smith was the track manager then. The site of the old drag strip is today a residential area. More research is needed to find out the span of years this track ran.
 
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map
125171013
125171013
125171013
September 6, 1969
125171013
Blaney Drag Stip, 1971 ​ aerial photo
Blaney Drag Stip, 1973 ​​ topo map
Advertisement in ​​​​Dixie Drag News, May 1, 1963. Courtesy of W. C. Williams

Camden Drag Strip (Shepard)

  • Years of Operation:   late 1960s- early 1970s
  • Status:  4

Two seven-year-old cousins were killed and five people injured when Eddie Bracey lost control of his '71 Ford Torino on June 17, 1972, at what newspapers reported was the Camden Drag Strip. He went into a slide into his opponent's lane and tried to pull back but hit a utility pole. He tore through a fence and into a line of cars parked on the edge of the race track. About two hundred people were watching the race. Other than the report of this drag strip accident, research was unable to find any further information about this track until DSL was contacted with Robert Anderson. In talking with him by phone, he identified the location of the old strip and recalled a little of its operation.
 
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map

Chester Drag Strip


Drag races were conducted on a 150-foot wide, mile-long asphalt runway of the Chester airport. Bob Osiecki managed the races, which were conducted by the International Timing Association. The Road Rebels Car Club also helped in timing at the races. The ITA held a 3-day race on November 29 thru December 1, 1957. Setto Postoian garnered top eliminator in his Chrysler-powered dragster, clocking a 161 MPH top speed. Art Arfons set a new record for gas dragsters with 158.60 MPH. Arfons was slowing down from a 152 MPH run when he lost control and went hurtling end over end in his Rolls Royce-powered Green Monster. He fortunately suffered only a broken finger, but his drag car was demolished. Don Garlits set a track record of 160.71 MPH. On April 12, 1958, more than 100 entries took part in the regular racing. Ted Helms had the fastest time of the meet with 102.27 MPH in his Chev-powered 1940 Ford. On August 30, 1958, Don Garlits set the track record with a run of 166.50 MPH. At the second annual 3-day International Drag Races on November 27-29, 1958, Setto Postoian ripped off a run of 161 MPH to win top eliminator honors. Art Arfons ran 166.50 MPH in his A/GD. Don Garlits blew three engines, but had a good run of 163 MPH. On June 20, 1959, Garlits was severely burned while driving his Swamp Rat 1 dragster. The manifold ruptured while he was making a 170 MPH run at Chester. "I was a fresh kid who enjoyed building fast cars and racing them," Garlits said. "But after the accident, everything was different. . . .  after that, it was a business, a tough, exciting business. But no game."  Art Malone took over Garlits's driving duties in his dragster while Big Daddy recuperated from this horrifying accident. On November 27, 1959, Dave Reitz from Ryattsville, Maryland, set a world record for 1/8th-mile with a 142.35 MPH run in his DeSoto-powered dragster.
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map
125171013
1958
CLICK HERE to see very brief video footage of Don Garlits's fiery ride at Chester in 1959, pan to 20:30 minute mark

Cooper River Dragway/Lowcountry Dragway (Moncks Corner)


When this 1/8th-mile track opened, at least by 1977, it ran every Sunday and was sanctioned by NHRA. It was located six miles south of Moncks Corner. On June 12, 1977, Jimmy Robinson of Lugoff took first place worth $175 in the Gas and Modified Eliminator. On November 20, 1977, Bobby Russell of Charleston won the Gas and Modified category with his Camaro.  F. Hammond Johnson filed incorporation papers for Lowcountry Dragway on February 25, 2005. It only operated for three years under the Lowcountry name before closing on April 21, 2007. It is now a housing development.
 
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map
CLICK HERE to see video footage of Cooper River Dragway, 1984, filmed by Al Smith, 8:22 minutes
125171013
2005 aerial view of Lowcountry Dragway

Darlington County Airport (Dovesville)


This asphalt-surfaced air strip was located four miles north of Dovesville on Highway 52. The first race was held here on September 28, 1957. Spectators were admitted for 90 cents and race entries were charged $1.50. Races were held weekly on Saturdays, being called the Dixie Drag Races. Beginning with the race on October 5, 1957, the races were sanctioned and supervised by NASCAR.
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map

Darlington International Dragway/Darlington Dragway

  • Years of Operation:   1976-present

On June 6, 1972, Harold Brasington filed incorporation papers for Darlington International Dragway. A few months later, the Florence Morning News gave details about the strip, indicating it would "possibly [be] one of the finest in the Carolinas."  To be built north of Highway 151 in Hartsville, the strip was to be 4,500 feet long and 70 feet wide. Three thousand feet from the start, a 66-foot wide concrete bridge was built over Swift Creek. A grandstand was built to seat 10,000 people and bleachers for 3,500 people. It opened under the name Darlington International Dragway, but generally was known just as Darlington Dragway, built and managed by Harold Brasington. On June 4-6, 1976, over 400 racers competed in the IHRA Southern Nationals for a $200,000 purse. Unfortunately rains washed out the race, postponing it to mid-October when rains again plagued the event and the final eliminations had to be cancelled. A few other events were run in 1976. They included the U.S. Open Nationals Motorcycle Drag Race Championships. It was won by Marion Owens who turned 8.46 ET on his '69 Harley. Sam Carroll won the $10,000 purse at the Bracket Nationals in July 1976. Hoping to overcome the rain jinx, the IHRA Winter Nationals were scheduled for March 18-20, 1977. Over 17,000 spectators watched the racing over the three days. The pro winners were Paul Longenecker (top fuel), Tom McEwen (funny car), and Harold Denton (pro stock).
 
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map
125171013
CLICK HERE to see video footage of funny cars at Darlington Dragway, 1988, 2.17 minutes
CLICK HERE to see video footage of Darlington Dragway, 1986, 0.58 minutes

Darlington Quarter Drag Strip/Darlington Drag Strip/Florence-Darlington Drag Strip

  • Years of Operation: 1964-65, 1967-70

In December 1963, J. O. Padgett, on behalf of a car club,  asked the Darlington County Commission for permission to use a taxiway at Darlington County Airport for drag racing. The commission took no official action regarding racing at the airport, which was located nine miles north of Darlington. Although that news was disappointing to the drag racing community, a new drag strip development soon brought racing even closer to Darlington. When it opened, newspapers said that the "all-new" Darlington Quarter Drag Strip was located about two miles south of Darlington off Highway 52. This quarter-mile strip was operated by co-owners Bob Dunbar and Bill Warren. It was a paved half-mile long asphalt track, lit for night racing with 25 light poles strung along the strip and others in the pit area.  The return road was dirt. The opening race was scheduled for May 30, but it was rained out. The track had its opening race on Saturday night, June 6, 1964. There were fifty cars and 600 spectators at the opener. Billy Hopson won top eliminator. Having limited success holding races on Saturday nights, the track began holding races on Wednesday night on July 22. J. C. Padgett of Darlington took top eliminator at that first Wednesday night affair. After a winter break, racing resumed on Saturday, April 3, 1965. On Saturday, June 20, 1965, the fiberglass Hemi Plymouths of Tom "Smoker" Smith and Jimmy Boyd were pitted in a best-of-five match race, won by Smith. "I like the Darlington Quarter layout," said Tom Smith, "it's got plenty of stopping room." For added crowd interest, in July 1965, the women racing in the Powder Puff used a Le Mans-style out-of-the-car start for their event. They lined up about ten feet from their cars and on signal, raced to their cars to start them and roar off. On September 5, 1965, Tom "Smoker" Smith was beaten by Harold Cain of Fayetteville, North Carolina, running his 130 MPH Mustang. Research didn't find any information in 1966, but the track re-opened under new management on Thursday, August 31, 1967, being called Darlington Drag Strip. A newspaper ad for a race on May 11, 1968, said that racing would be conducted for 1/5th-mile. In 1970, the name of the strip was again changed, this time to Florence-Darlington Drag Strip. According to "Old Timer," this strip was in operation until 1999, despite having to compete with the larger Darlington Dragway, only seven miles northwest of it. Research in newspapers only found mention of the strip through 1980. On April 12, 1980, Tommy Matthews was killed while riding as a passenger in a car at the strip. The car hit a light pole and turned over several times.
 
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map
125171013
Florence-Darlington Drag Strip, 1994 ​ historic aerial photo
125171013
August 31, 1967
125171013
April 11, 1970
125171013
April 6, 1974

Donaldson Air Force Base (Greenville)


The Greenville International Drag Races were held on May 15-16, 1965, on a runway at the base. A $10,000 purse attracted cars from as distant as Seattle. The old military airfield was deactivated in 1963 and is today's Donaldson Center Airport, located just south of Greenville.
 
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map

Greenville-Pickens Speedway


The International Timing Association scheduled an 1/8th-mile drag racing program to be run on Thursday nights on this half-mile dirt oval track. One of the races was held on July 16, 1959. The track continues to operate today (2015).
 
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map

Greer Dragway

  • Years of Operation: 1954-present

A drag strip in Greer purportedly started in about 1954 at what then was called the Jaycee Dragway. It was a quarter-mile racing strip. In 1959 the Greer Jaycees spent $18,000 repaving and rebuilding their drag strip. At that time it was sanctioned by the International Timing Association. Bob Osiecki was brought in to help manage the strip. They reopened on July 18, 1959, for Saturday night racing. They expected 250 cars. In some news articles, it was called the Greer Jaycee Dragstrip, sanctioned by NHRA. On July 23, 1966, Huston Platt faced Ed Skelton in a match race of Chevy vs. Ford. In 1978, increased speeds forced them to change from quarter-mile to 1/8th-mile racing. At this time (2015), the track continues operation as an 1/8th-mile strip under IHRA sanction.
 
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map
125171013
Clipping from Gene Cromer's scrapbook. Courtesy of Frank Taylor
CLICK HERE to see video footage of Southeast Gassers Association at Greer Dragway, April 2014, 2 minutes

Jackson Drag Strip/Carolina Dragway

  • Years of Operation: 1957-present

A corporation was formed to sell shares of stock for $100 apiece for a capital of $7500 to build a drag strip. It was located (in 1957) on what was called Dual Highway just one mile northwest of Jackson. L. B. "Junior" Steed opened the track to racing in April 1957, but the official grand opener was held on July 30, 1957, rain slowing the times. It was reported that many racers touted Jackson Drag Strip as the smoothest, best strip in the Southeast. Races were conducted every Saturday night, with cash awards and trophies for class winners. On June 13, 1959, Ed Campbell of Bristol, West Virginia, copped top eliminator in his '56 Chevy with a top speed of 100.80 MPH. On August 3, 1963, a two-out-of-three match race featured well-known stock car drivers Junior Johnson and Fred Lorenzen.  In the late 1960s, Junior Steed opened the track for teenagers to run on Sunday afternoons free of charge. In early 1969, a bill was introduced to the state legislature to make drag racing exempt from the state's Sunday blue laws in Aiken County.
125171013
1957
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map
125171013
CLICK HERE to see 8mm video footage of Jackson Drag Strip in 1965, including Richard Petty in his "43 Jr." Plymouth Barracuda, Leeming family home movie, 2 minutes, no sound
Clipping from Gene Cromer's scrapbook. Courtesy of Frank Taylor

Lakeside Drag Strip ​(Williamston)

  • Years of Operation:  ? - ?

This track was located in the southwest outskirts of Williamston. Frank Taylor wrote DSL:  "The starting line and about half of the track are in a cow pasture. The rest of the track is being used as a driveway for a few houses.Skyland Drive is the old track."
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map

Mid-Carolina Drag Strip (Batesburg)


This track, located four miles south of Batesburg on Highway 391, operated as a dirt track in the early 1960s. After running for a year, it was paved with asphalt. One of the early news articles reported that Jack McClure would make exhibition runs in his turbine-engined go-kart on Saturday night, May 23, 1964. On June 19, 1965, Huston Platt beat Carson Hyman in his '55 T-Bird in a best three-out-of-five match race. Other big-name racers who ran on this track include E. J. "Parachute" Potter, Howard Neal, and Don Nicholson. On August 21, 1965, Cecil Darnell's "Red Demon" jet dragster driven by Bert Wilkerson made some exhibition passes. There was serious concern that he could stop it in the 1,400 foot shutdown area.
 
CLICK HERE to see video footage of defunct Mid-Carolina Drag Strip in 2015, 2 minutes, no sound
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map
125171013
125171013
Drag Strip marked on 1965 ​​ topo map
Mid-Carolina Drag Strip, on 1962 ​​ aerial photo

Midway Dragstrip/Dragway (Greeleyville)

  • Years of Operation:  1999-2009, 2015-present

This 1/8th-mile IHRA drag strip was in operation for a decade before shutting down.  After a change in ownership in 2007, the track name changed from Midway Dragstrip to Midway Dragway. One online source said the track didn't open until 2001. The track got its name because it was halfway between Charleston and Florence. In 2011, three men from Gastonia bought the track with the hope of making major improvements to the rundown track. The three were Kevin Gann, Mark Helms, and Kevin Cody  They had hopes of getting the track ready for limited racing in summer 2011. Research was unable to find out if their hopes were realized. But the track did re-open in 2015 under the name Midway Motorsports Park.
 
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map
CLICK HERE to see video footage of Midway Dragway, 2009, 1:58 minute

Myrtle Beach International Dragway

  • Years of Operation:  ca. 1966-68?
  • Status:  Exact location unknown

The Myrtle Beach Jaycees were planning on holding a 2-day Southeastern Drag Race on November 26-27, 1966, but cancelled due to poor ticket sales. It was listed in a listing of U.S. drag strips in 1968 published in an issue of the Swedish magazine Start & Strip .  More research is needed to find out its years of operation, details, and specific location.
 
Did you race here? Tell us about it.

Newberry Fairgrounds Speedway

  • Years of Operation: 1959
  • Status:  Exact location unknown

Beginning in at least August 1959, races were held on this half-mile dirt oval track on Saturday nights. Clyde Summer of Aiken won on August 15 in his 1957 Ford. On September 19, Jimmy Claxton was the victor, earning him the right to represent Newberry at the National Meet of Champions at Crown Point, Indiana. Research couldn't find drag racing occurring at this track other than in 1959. The speedway stopped running oval races in about 1979. The location of the old speedway hasn't been uncovered yet in research.
 
Did you race here? Tell us about it.

Orangeburg Drag Strip (Neeses)

  • Years of Operation: 1961-present

The original owners were T. J. Ashe, Ezel Hutto, and Nick Davis. It had no timing equipment and no guardrail. It was a quarter mile strip with a quarter mile shutdown.The track and return road were repaved before the 1968 season. Trophies were awarded to all class winners and money prizes doled out to all eliminator winners.  In 1972 it was bought by the DeWitt brothers (Zane, Tommy, Jimmy), who installed timing equipment and instituted grudge racing. On October 24, 1976, Rick Jeffcoat lost control of his '65 Mustang and crashed through a fence lining the strip, killing a spectator, 20-year-old Glenn Mickens. In 1982 Don Garrick bought the strip. He scheduled Thursday night and Sunday grudge racing. In the 1990s the track was owned by Charles and Johnny Dowey who tore up the asphalt and laid down concrete. In 2001 Jimmy and Zane DeWitt repurchased the track. It was sold to Buddy Boozer in 2006, who is the current owner. He completely refurbished the track, including a new surface. He kept the tower, which had been obtained from a demolished prison.
 
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map
CLICK HERE to see video footage of funny cars racing at Orangeburg Drag Strip on June 16, 2007, 1 minute
CLICK HERE to see Super 8 video footage of Orangeburg Drag Strip, 1986, 3:15 minutes
CLICK HERE to see video footage of  Orangeburg Drag Strip, 1983, 8:42 minutes

Pageland Drag Strip

  • Years of Operation:  early 1960s-ca. 1982
  • Status:  4

Frank Spittle, who raced a few times at this drag strip in about the early 1960s, remembered that this strip was "pretty decent." It was paved when he raced there, but he thinks it might have begun as a dirt track possibly in the 1950s. He visited it in 2016 and said there were trees growing up through the old pavement as it returned to nature. Research hasn't found any newspaper or Internet documentation about the old strip. More research is needed to find out the exact years of operation and history details.
 
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map

Palmetto Drag Strip (Pelion)


This 4,500-foot quarter-mile drag strip was located thirteen miles south of Columbia on Highway 215 in the hamlet of Pelion. It was built on a 300-acre site. Recollections of old timers are that the races took place on the airport just north of Pelion, which is now the Lexington County Airport. Since the airport wasn't activated until 1974, the strip must have predated it at that location. On November 21, 1959, Bondy Long of Camden set a track record at the new race track in his "Snoopy" dragster with a 141.95 MPH run. The race on Thanksgiving Day had 34 classes, powder puff racing, and a turkey scramble. Six turkeys were turned loose for the drivers to catch. In 1960, racing was held on Saturdays, conducted by the Palmetto Racing Affiliates. As of May 1960, the track record was 147 MPH. In May 1960, Lewis Carden of Birmingham set a new elapsed time record with a 9.43 second pass. The track hosted the NHRA Southeast Division Championships on July 2 and July 4, 1960. Three national records were set and Hoyt Grimes of Atlanta set a new track record with a 147.10 MPH run. Cecil Curry from Greenville got top eliminator in his A dragster.  One of the national records was the C/GS record established by Pete Robinson of Atlanta (the Pete Robinson?) in a 1940 Ford with a run of 106.71 MPH. On October 1, 1960, Palmetto held the first annual South Carolina State Championship drag races. In May 1961, Art Malone set a new track record with a 174 MPH run in 8.4 seconds. On August 5, 1961, Don Garlits made his third appearance at Palmetto. Garlits liked the track, saying it was a "great strip." On May 13, 1967, "Sneaky" Pete Robinson set a national speed record at a NASCAR sanctioned race at Palmetto. He ran 218.44 MPH in 6.97 seconds. Research didn't uncover any information about racing at Palmetto after 1968. However in 1972, a light plane loaded with over 450 pounds of marijuana landed at the strip.  Authorities were able to interrupt the drug smuggling attempt. R ead Henry Doriot's interesting recollections of attending an NHRA race at this strip in the early 1960s on the Memories (South Carolina) page.
 
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map
125171013
It was still marked as a "Drag Strip" on a 1982 topo map

Piedmont Interstate Fairgrounds (Spartanburg)


A weekly series of Friday night drag races started on about June 12, 1959. On that date they expected about 100 racers.
 
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map

Rambi Raceway (Myrtle Beach)


International Timing Association sanctioned 1/8th-mile drag racing at this half-mile dirt oval track that ws built in Myrtle Beach in 1958. They scheduled the races every Friday night. On June 3, 1960, the annual Sun Fun drag race was held. The oval operates still today (2015) as Myrtle Beach Speedway.
 
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map

Spartanburg Dragway (Roebuck)


The grand opening of Paul Clayton's drag strip was held March 21, 1964. It was located on Canaan Road off U.S. Highway 221, south of Spartanburg. In 1967, the track ran on the first and third Saturday nights from March through October. It ran under NHRA sanction that year, if not before, with Bill Garland being the race director. After the track had closed following a race on late Saturday night, September 29, 1973, three motorcyclists started racing around the drag strip. One of the three, Ralph Howard Johnson, age 25 from Gastonia, North Carolina, lost control of his cycle and was killed when he slammed into a fence. In 1978, Paul Clayton sold the strip to Bob Rogers, owner of an automobile leasing business in Greenville. Rogers undertook an expensive remodeling program and the track was under full IHRA sanction for the first time. The race track was bought in 1983 by Roger Millikin and a group intent on developing the area into a country club/golf course.
 
125171013
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map
March 21, 1964
CLICK HERE to see video footage of Spartanburg Dragway in 1981, 2:47 minutes
CLICK HERE to see 8mm video footage of Spartanburg Dragway in 1974, 3:50 minutes, no sound/music only

Starlite 25 Drag Strip/Ware Shoals Dragway

  • Years of Operation: 1955-present

Organized drag races were reportedly conducted in the vicinity of Greenville, South Carolina, in 1955. This may be the strip that was listed as being located in Greenville in a listing of U.S. drag strips in 1968 published in an issue of the Swedish magazine Start & Strip .   Frank Taylor, a DSL reader, said that the strip was dirt when it first opened in the 1950s . Tommy Hill wrote DSL that the old Starlite Drag Strip was what is today (2017) operating as Ware Shoals Dragway on Highway 25 between Greenville and Ware Shoals. It runs under IHRA sanction and is an 1/8th-mile track. The track has been owned (and is still owned)  by the Gambrell family since its opening. More research is needed to find when the strip opened and details about its history.
 
125171013
1966 clipping from Gene Cromer's scrapbook. Courtesy of Frank Taylor
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map
CLICK HERE to see video footage of Ware Shoals Dragway in 1989, 2:45 minutes

Walterboro Drag Strip


A Saturday night racing program was run on the city's airport runway, begun in 1956 by Roger Odum and Tommy Gibson. A noon until midnight drag racing program was scheduled to be held on Labor Day, September 7, 1959.  “Walterboro rolled up the sidewalks at 6 p.m. There wasn’t much else to do except race,” said racer Charles Hall . “When I first went there in 1958, it was going strong.” Hall started racing with a slightly modified '50 Ford, then heavily modified a '55 Ford. Until 1960, running 70 MPH was considered fast. But then Ford came out with the 352 cu.in. engine with 360 horsepower in 1960, and all of a sudden, everyone was going 100. “Guy named Buster Sweat from Summerville went to the Ford place in St. George and bought one of the ugliest, 4-door, plain black Fords you ever saw. He came back from St. George to Walterboro, took the hubcaps off and went down the strip. And the very first time he went over 100 mph,” Hall said. “One night there were two Fords, 17 Chevys, 60 Pontiacs and one Oldsmobile running, and he outran everything. Everybody knew that car.” It cost $1 for spectator admission and $1.50 to race. They awarded one trophy for the over-all winner. The end of racing at the airport came as a result of politics. “We were racing one night and some big wheel senator was going to Hilton Head. He came in with an unscheduled flight and had to wait to land until they cleared the track. And he raised Cain about it,” Hall said. Not too long after that, racing at the airport track came to a close. Don Garlits made some exhibition runs there around 1959-60.
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map