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Drag Strip List

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Rhode Island
Drag Strips

Bill Lawton driving a Tasca Ford Super Stocker at Charlestown NAS Drag Strip. Photographer unknown

Charlestown

  • Charlestown Drag Strip, 1963-64
 
My Soap Box Derby car was sponsored by SNETA, which operated the drag strip at the old Naval Air Station in Charlestown, R.I.I don't remember a track name, just a hand-written sign said "Drags," with an arrow to point which direction. I think I was thirteen (1963). I got to the strip with my neighbor's boyfriend before that. I remember Tasca's '63 Galaxy racing Norwood Motors 409 Bel Air and a whole lot more. When I was 14 I would hitchhike there from the North Prov. line on Smith Street (Rt. 44) and back. The late Joe Vanni (Bailey Motors B/S Plymouth ) was my first contact. Later I found out a distant cousin ran the PA system. I would sit on the ground and lean against any available first row spectator car bumper when I was not cruising the pits. Once a 348 Chevy blew it's clutch and I remember like slow motion pieces bouncing toward me across the strip. A pressure plate spring went into the front tire of the car I was leaning on. Later I discovered my ankle bleeding. One of those pieces found me. At least not in the crotch! Jimmy King's blown small block A/D, called El Diablo I think. Al Oats' Hilborn injected, B& M Hydro equipped, B/G Anglia. called "The Growler."
Brian O'Reilly
  • Charlestown Drag Strip, 1964
 
I remember hitchhiking at 14 years old to Charlestown Dragway. There were probably 3 or 4 of us sneaking in through the weeds to watch Tasca Ford Thunderbolt, driven by Bill Lawton, race Yankee Peddler, driven by Bill Flynn in 1964. Also there was a lot of local guys racing GTOs. They were the rage of the track for street stock. It closed before I got my driver's license BUT the stretch of Route 1 just outside of the track had the best straight-away around. From 1966 thru 1970, on Sunday nights, sometimes there would be 12 or so cars matching up for about an hour. There was only one cop in that town then and he would be sleeping.
John Conroy