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Duncan "Drag Strip" (1955)
Lake Murray State Park (Ardmore) (1955)
Lawton Municipal Airport (1955)

Mustang Field (El Reno) (1956)
Oklahoma City Drag Strip/Jaycee Drag Strip (1956)

Eaker Field (Durant) (1958)
Tulsa North Airport (1958)
Wheatley Airport Drag Strip (Moore) (1958)

Woodring Municipal Airport (Enid) (1960)
Ardmore Dragway (Springer) (1962)
Cherokee Dragway (Frederick) (1963)
McAlester "Drag Strip" (1963)
Duncan Drag Strip (1964)
Sand Valley Drag Strip/Oklahoma City Raceway (1965)
Southwest Raceway (Tulsa) (1965)
Willow Run Raceway/Oklahoma City International Raceway Park (1966)
Cushing Drag Strip (1967)
Sooner Raceway (Ringwood) (1967)
Southwest Dragway/L.A. Dragway (Lawton) (1967)
​B & B Drag Strip (Guymon) (1960s)
Woodward Drag Strip (1960s)
Four-Sons Speedway Park (Guthrie) (1970)
Frontier International Raceway (Oklahoma City) (1970)
Texhoma Motorplex (Walters) (1999)
 
Oklahoma State Fair Speedway. Photographer unknown
  • Years of Operation: ca. 1962-present

Ardmore Dragway incorrectly lays claim to being the oldest continually-run drag strip in America on their website. They date their beginning to 1955 when the Slow Pokes car club built a drag strip in Ardmore. However, that drag strip was a few miles southeast of Ardmore in Lake Murray State Park (see below), not in the present location of the Ardmore Dragway a mile south of Springer (and nine miles north of Ardmore). So we're talking about two different drag strips in different locations. As to Ardmore Dragway being the oldest continually-run drag strip in America, that claim doesn't hold water either. Several continually-run drag strips that are still in operation (2015) predate Ardmore, even if we were to use 1955 as the strip's bench mark date (which is incorrect). They include Thornhill in Kentucky (1953),  Greer Dragway in South Carolina (1954), and Beech Bend Raceway in Kentucky (1951),   My e-mail request to Ardmore Dragway about these questions was not answered. I did a thorough search of the Ardmore Daily Ardmoreite newspaper to try to find out when the old airport one mile south of Springer (the present location of Ardmore Dragway) was first used. The first time that its use as a drag strip as reported in the local newspaper was on June 17, 1962 ("Drag races set at Springer today," Ardmore Daily Ardmorite, June 17, 1962). The newspaper reported that it was to be a regional meet, attracting entries from Oklahoma City, Shawnee, Ada, McAlester, and Ardmore. They were awarding a trophy for top eliminator. If the Ardmore Dragway didn't begin racing in its present location until 1962, then there are dozens of continually-run drag strips in America that are older than it. So when did the present location of the Ardmore Dragway begin? Research shows that the Slowpokes car club raced on their Lake Murray strip in 1955 and 1956. The Ardmoreite newspaper mentioned the drag strip several times in 1957, but never in the context of racing. The report of the June 17 race implies that the airstrip had been used for regional races before. It stated that Jess Mitchell of Ardmore won top eliminator  "before one of the largest crowds ever to watch the regional drag races held at the Ardmore drag strip north of town." So there had been drag races at the airstrip before June 17, 1962, but the crowds had never been as large as on that recent date. I would conclude from this that the airstrip would have first been used for drag racing at some year between 1958 and 1961. If we give it the benefit of the doubt and say that it was the earliest of those years, i.e. 1958, then there are still dozens of current continuously- running drag strips in America that are older than Ardmore. And there is no mention in these 1962 articles that the Slow Pokes played any role in the operation of the Ardmore Dragway in the 1960s. On June 24, 1962, the losers of the regional meet competed in a grudge race. On July 8, racers from Texas and Oklahoma again raced in a district championship meet. Dennis Lavers garnered the Super Stock trophy in his '62 Impala. On August 26, 1962, 1,200 spectators watched Bob Bolton of Tishomingo take top eliminator in his Ford. Electronic timing clocks were first used at the strip on March 10, 1963.  The asphalt track was lengthened to 3,000 feet for the 1965 season. There is mention in 1965 of the involvement of the Slow Pokes, so it is possible that they were involved from its ear4liest years, but just didn't get public mention.
 
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October 18, 1970
CLICK HERE to see video footage of Hot Rod Reunion at Ardmore Dragway on September 3, 2011, with Dale Emery, Bobby Langley, etc., 8:05 minutes

B & B Drag Strip ​(Guymon)


DSL reader Russ Herrick recalled racing at a strip north of the town, possibly on an old section of highway. Read his recollections of racing there in circa 1969-70 in Memories (Oklahoma) . DSL wasn't able to find any information about this until contacting the Guymon Public Library and Arts Center. Archivist Miranda Glibert had done some research on the old drag strip and sent the following information:  "B&B’s Drag Strip located northwest of Guymon, OK on US. Hwy 64 was a popular place for racing action on Sundays in the 1960s and 1970s. The drag strip was paved, had lighting, trees, and was owned and operated by Bill Beamon.  Beamon was a Guymonite and businessman also owning Cowboy Cleaners on the 1300 block of N. Main where Bank of the Panhandle now exists. The cleaners was damaged in a fire due to a steam dryer coil explosion and an electrical junction box igniting clothing in 1974. The drag strip was an attraction not just for locals, but also for competitors from Texas, Kansas and other parts of the state of Oklahoma. Each class would race in elimination rounds to see who would end up the top street eliminator and the top stock eliminator. Classes of stock racing included D stock, E stock, E stock automatic, F stock, G stock automatic, I stock automatic, and J stock automatic. Street class racing included B altered, B modified, C modified, C gas, D gas, D modified, E gas, F gas, J gas, J super stock, J super stock automatic, K stock, L stock, M stock, N stock, O stock, and P stock. (Cook, Hass Win Top Eliminators at B&B, GDH, June 24, 1969)
According to memories of those who enjoyed the strip, the far end was rough and potholed, as were parts of the track. The strip was eventually closed and the lights removed, making it harder to locate today. It was possibly located north of CD Alexander’s horse facility on the south side of US 64 just past the bend in the highway north of Guymon, according to some accounts. Beamon was also well-known for starting the Elks boxing club in 1954. Later named the Guymon Boxing Club, Beamon coached many for nearly 20 years and hosted tournaments at the fairgrounds with fighters from as far as Lubbock, Texas. Guymon fighters brought back state titles which at the time were earned at the Kansas-Oklahoma State Tournaments, a preliminary to the National Golden Gloves Championship. Beamon took several to compete for Golden Gloves, and a few won on regional level. While coaching boxing, Beamon would also set up benefit matches in which money raised was given the group then known as the Panhandle Area Council for Mentally Retarded Children. Beamon was not just known for helping the Council with expenses, but for also helping the boys find a 'good clean sport in which to participate.' (Guymon Boxers Down Hutchinson, GDH, Tues., Feb. 4, 1969)"
    
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Cherokee Dragway (Frederick)


Beginning at least by May 1963, this NHRA-sanctioned strip ran on the first Sunday of the month. It was called Frederick Drag Strip in listings in Hot Rod.  Racing took place at the municipal airport located just southeast of town. Racing reportedly first took place on the eastern-most taxiway, running toward the north. Then later in the 1960s, they ran toward the east on the south taxiway.  In the 1970s, they ran on the south taxiway, but changed directions, going from east to west. It was also called Cherokee Strip Dragway. Marvin Griffin was the track manager in 1967, running races on the first Sunday of each month.
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May 6, 1973
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Listing in National Dragster, Dec. 23, 1977. Courtesy of Mel Bashore

Cushing Drag Strip


Cushing Drag Strip was sanctioned by NHRA at least as early as 1967, if not earlier. In 1967 races were held on the second and fourth Sundays. They may have been held on the circa 1943 municipal airport located two miles south of town. The drag strip was listed as one of 325 U.S. drag strips in 1968 published in an issue of the Swedish magazine Start & Strip.  
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Duncan "Drag Strip"


Beginning in at least October 1955, the Hi-Lifters car club held drag races every Sunday southwest of Duncan, Oklahoma. The drag strip was located three miles west of Duncan and one mile south on Cemetery Road.
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1955

Duncan Drag Strip


Don Nutt, a used car dealer in Duncan, owned this drag strip. It was located southwest of Duncan off Bois D'Arc (2 miles west of Highway 81 on Bois D'Arc, then 1 mile south, on the east side of 46th?). There was a race on Saturday, July 18, 1964, in which trophies were awarded to class winners. On Sunday, July 26, 1964, Coy Schones of Oklahoma City, set a new strip record in his '55 Chevy B gasser when he won top street eliminator in 10.85 seconds. Tommy Kilpatrick of Lawton won top stock eliminator in his '57 Chevy F/S. In 2003, the track was still there, being owned by a farmer. He used the tarmac as a place to park his farm equipment.
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July 16, 1966

Eaker Field ​(Durant)


The Durant city council granted approval for a request to hold drag races on the last Sunday of each month at the city airport. The races were to be sponsored by the Durant Jaycees and conducted by the Roadbinders car club. The track operated under NHRA sanction at least by 1959. In 1960, races were conducted by the Durant Timing Association. A couple of NHRA records were set here at a meet in June 1960. One of the records was set by L. C. Kirby from Dallas in AM/SP with an 11.16 time. Research was unable to uncover any further information; more research is needed.
 
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Four-Sons Speedway Park (Guthrie)


This dirt oval track, located south of Guthrie, opened in 1966. A drag strip was added to the site near the end of the race track's existence--sometime in the 1970s.
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Frontier International Raceway (Oklahoma City)


This track was formerly Willow Run Raceway. Doug Waggoner wrote that Willow Run closed "in 1969 when the promoter took off with the gate receipts. After that it closed and reopened in 1970 as Frontier International Raceway."  It changed from NHRA to AHRA sanction in 1970. Research has uncovered little about this raceway other than the 1970 AHRA Grand American Nationals which was staged there in mid-May. The track had grandstands and a dirt pit area. When stock class racer Roy Pogue lost in the semifinals on a break out, he issued a protest about the timing system. Getting no satisfaction, he got back into his race car and mowed down the Christmas Tree. He kept going straight down the strip, turned off at the end, went out the pit gate, onto the highway, and that was the last they saw of Roy Pogue. AHRA President Jim Tice banned Pogue from AHRA national events and sanctioned tracks for life. A short time later, Pogue was given a lifetime ban from NHRA, too. Dave Labs wrote about what happened at this meet after Pogue destroyed the Tree. He said, “Because of Roy's antics, the finals in Funny Car and Top Fuel had to be run with the last known flag start at a national event. In the Funny Car Final, Gene Snow was disqualified for leaving the line before the flag was thrown, giving Don Prudhomme the easy win." Jim King took top fuel and Ronnie Sox won pro stock. The Frontier track only ran in 1970.  Read Jeff Bishop's recollections of attending this 1970 race when he was young in the  Memories (OK) section of this website .
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Frontier International Raceway, ad for 1970 AHRA Grand American Nationals race. Courtesy of Doug Waggoner
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CLICK HERE to see video slide show of 1970 AHRA Grand American Nationals at Frontier Intl. Raceway, 8:02 minutes
Frontier International Raceway, labeled as "Drag Strip" on 1970 ​​ topo map

Lake Murray State Park (Ardmore)


The Slowpokes Automobile Club, based in Ardmore, Oklahoma, persuaded Lake Murray State Park to approve construction of a quarter-mile dirt-surfaced drag strip in August 1955. The location was just east of the Lake Murray airstrip on state land. They completed the grading work and scheduled the first race for September 25. It rained on that day, so they rescheduled the track's first race for the following Sunday, October 2. The dusty racing had limited both spectators and entries, so the Slowpokes applied a hard-surface coating of road oil to minimize the clouds of dust. This was done prior to the race on October 23, 1955. They had forty cars enter, the track's most ever for that event. They didn't charge admission, but accepted donations to defray expenses. The final race of the 1955 season was held on November 13.
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Lawton Municipal Airport


In about August 1955, the Gasoline Cowboys car club got a lease to hold Sunday drag races on a strip of land at the old Lawton Airport. More research is needed.
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McAlester "Drag Strip"

  • Years of Operation: 1963
  • Status:  Exact location unknown

There was reportedly a drag strip in McAlester. There was drag racing there at least as early as July 1963, if not earlier. Research did not uncover anything other than this single race in 1963. It may have taken place at the airport, just south of town, but no proof of that. More research is needed.
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Did you race here? Tell us about it.
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Mustang Field (El Reno)


Mustang Field (now called El Reno Municpal Air Park) is located five miles southwest of El Reno. The Reno Road Ramblers car club received permission to hold drag races on one of the old runways of the old army airfield. Mac Oyler was club president. The first race was held on May 20, 1956, garnering a $90 profit for the club. They lacked timing equipment, so just competed in racing each other. Spectators were charged 25 cents for admission. The second race was scheduled to be held on June 3, 1956. However it was cancelled because the surface of the air strip was deemed too thin for the rough treatment it received from the racers. Club members tried to find a sympathetic farmer who would permit them to race on their farm land without success.

Oklahoma City Drag Strip/Jaycee Drag Strip


The Jaycees helped raise $17,000 to build a drag strip on the State Fairgrounds. They began conducting races there in June 1956. In 1957, NHRA held its third national championships at the fairgrounds strip on August 30-31 thru September 1-2.  It was sponsored by the Oklahoma City Junior Chamber of Commerce. The NHRA staff was assisted by the Oklahoma City Timing Association. The asphalt track was lengthened to 3,700 feet to give more shutdown room.  450 entrants from at least 38 states took part in NHRA's third National Championships. NHRA decided to allow only gasoline (no nitro or exotic fuels) in competing cars at the Nationals, and instituted a fuel ban at all their sanctioned drag strips. Art Arfons clocked the top speed of the meet in his Rolls Royce-powered Green Monster with a run of 152.54 MPH, an impressive accomplishment on pump gas. Buddy Sampson, from Phoenix, won Top Eliminator at the wheel of his Olds-powered dragster with 10.42 E.T. run and 141.50 MPH top speed. Lefty Mudersbach was a member of Sampson's pit crew. The first casualty at an NHRA Nationals occurred at this race. Graden Miller died from injuries received on the opening day when the flywheel on his car exploded and he suffered severe, fatal burns. Drag races were held weekly. Newspaper ads in 1957 called it the Jaycee Drag Strip. On April 6, 1958, Jimmy Davis of Oklahoma City, set a new track ET record in A-dragster with a time of 10.11 seconds. NHRA held its fourth national championships in 1958 at the Jaycees Drag Strip on August 29-31 and September 1. There were 500 entries from 37 states, including a car owned by pro tennis star Pancho Gonzales, driven by his brother Ralph. On the first day, Lee Christian from Lubbock, Texas, set a new national record with a 155.17 MPH run in his gas dragster. Ted Cyr in the Cyr & Hopper dragster took top eliminator, garnering the 1958 National Champion title. Junior Thompson took NHRA's first-ever Little Eliminator title in his blown Chevy-powered '41 Studebaker B Gasser. Art Arfons set a national record in A/D in his Allison V-12-powered Green Monster II with a run of 156.24 MPH, although he recorded a quicker 161.67 mark during qualifying. News reports claimed that 50,000 people watched the four days of racing. On August 16, 1959, racing was timed on just 1,000 feet, shortening it from the quarter mile, ostensibly to allow more room for stopping. On August 30, 1959, the final day of the International Timing Association's championships, Bob Langley took top eliminator in the fuel division with a best speed of 157.34 MPH. 5,000 spectators on that final day saw Dode Martin's Dragmaster win top gas eliminator. Glen Ward, from Garden Grove, California,  had to be hospitalized when his brakes failed and he ran off the end of the strip at an estimated 160 MPH. He had earlier in the day beaten Arfons' Green Monster in an elimination run.
 
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November 24, 1957
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NHRA National Championship Drag Races, admission pass, 1957. Courtesy of Doug Waggoner
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CLICK HERE to see 8mm video footage of 1957 U.S. Nationals at Oklahoma City, pan through to 11:20 mark on this 13 minute film to see the OK segment
CLICK HERE to see 8mm video footage of Oklahoma City Drag Strip, produced by James Amos, first 20 seconds of clip

Sand Valley Drag Strip/Oklahoma City Raceway

 
Located southwest of the intersection of Council Road and I-40, this drag strip was built by James W. Nix, Sr., the father of the drag racer, in about 1965. Nix filed incorporation papers on December 8, 1965. Other incorporators on the project included Max Ramos, Oliver Hartman, and Robert Brown. One of the drawbacks of this track was the sandy pit area and a sandy track surface. The direction of racing was from west to east.  In about 1968, the Nix family changed the name of the track to Oklahoma City Raceway. Jimmy Nix retired briefly from racing in 1972 to devote time to business interests and operating the track. On August 16, 1969, Jim Cagle, a AA/FD driver from Odessa, Texas, was killed in a freak racing accident. He was driving Ray Whisenhunt's "Texas Terror" dragster in time trials. His car was up on hydraulic jacks behind the starting line.  When the throttle stuck, the vibration caused his car to shift off the jack. When the spinning tires hit the pavement, the car launched out of control down the track.  The car crashed through a cyclone fence at a speed of 100 MPH, went across a road, and smashed into a grove of trees. He was killed on impact. After that fatal accident, the strip eliminated fuel dragsters from its programs and focused more on bracket racing. The track had a short shutdown area and a bit of a curve to miss the North Canadian River to the south. One old timer remembered the nearby river in the shutdown area. He recalled, "I used to go to Oklahoma City Raceway in the summer of '72 and '73 on Wednesday nights. It was called grudge racing and it cost $4 to enter your car. It was handicapped 1/4 mile racing with a dial in. You raced whoever you were in line next to. If you crossed the finish line first and didn't break out, you got back in line until there were only 2 cars left . . . And yes if you didn't get shut down you could end up in the river." At some later point the track was called Stars & Stripes Dragway.
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Sooner Raceway (Ringwood)

 
Races were held every other Sunday on this NHRA-sanctioned strip in 1967. Gary Unruh was the track manager that year. It was listed as one of 325 U.S. drag strips in 1968 published in an issue of the Swedish magazine Start & Strip .  Ed Pogue was the track manager in 1968. But more research is needed to learn details about it, its exact location, and the years of its operation.  G. V. Gordon said it is "gradually being reclaimed by nature."     Read Garen Martens overview of the track's history in the Memories (Oklahoma) section.
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Did you race here? Tell us about it.
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Remnant of Sooner Raceway

Southwest Dragway/L. A. Dragway (Lawton)

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There was an 1/8th-mile drag strip located six miles south of Lawton. It was located two miles west of I-44, exiting on the Frederick Exit 30.  It was on Highway 36, adjacent and to the east of the old Faxon City Speedway, which has been demolished. Races took place every Sunday afternoon when it first opened in 1967. On June 11, 1967, they had GTO Day, where entry fees were suspended for GTOs. The following week they had 442 Day. The asphalt drag strip is still in fair condition and easily visible in aerial photos. In 1977, it was sanctioned by IHRA and ran every Sunday. Read Doug Waggoner's account of racing there from its opening until its sad demise in Memories (Oklahoma) .
1967
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CLICK HERE to see video footage of L.A. Dragway, 1987, filmed by Bruce Walker, 6 minutes
1977

Southwest Raceway (Tulsa)

  • Years of Operation: 1965-present
 
Incorporation papers were filed for Southwest Raceway on November 18, 1964, by James Kirkpatrick, Jerry Enterline, and R. Lollar. This track has also operated under the name of Tulsa International Raceway and is presently called Tulsa Raceway Park. Southwest Raceway has the distinction of being the track where NHRA initiated its World Finals race. Southwest hosted the World Finals first in 1965, and repeated as the site of that event in 1966, 1967, and 1968. Quite a distinction! The system of NHRA determining the season's champions at the World Finals was first established at the 1965 race at Tulsa. The top two points-getters in each class in each division qualified to compete at this event. At the 1965 race, Maynard Rupp took top fuel. In April 1966, a syndicate of businessmen purchased the drag strip with intentions of building a 5 million dollar racing complex. Their plans included building a 1.5-mile oval track, 2.5 mile sports car track, a half-mile oval track, and the drag strip. Tulsa had a distinctive timing tower and covered grandstands. Benny Osborn became NHRA's first two-time world champion when he took the top fuel title in 1967 and 1968. A $25,000 purse for the three top pro categories offered on the Memorial Day weekend in 1972 by the Professional Racers Association, organized by Don Garlits. The event was called National Challenge '72 and was in direct competition with NHRA's Nationals at Indianapolis and was backed by AHRA. It offered heftier prize money than the Indy race. The winners in the pro category were Don Moody (top fuel), Tom McEwen (funny car), and Bill Jenkins (pro stock). Thirty thousand people attended the final day of eliminations. A number of big-name racers opted to go for bigger paychecks at this race rather than NHRA's Indy race including Don Prudhomme, Don Garlits, Larry Brown, and Dennis Baca.
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July 3, 1966
CLICK HERE to see 8mm video footage of 1967 World Finals at Southwest Raceway in Tulsa, 5 minutes, no sound

Texhoma Motorplex (Walters)

  • Years of Operation: 1999-2002
 
This short-lived 1/8th-mile track was located east of I-44 and the Walters Municipal Airport.
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Texhoma Motorplex (right), located northeasterly from Walters Turnpike Airport and I-40, 2003 aerial photo

Tulsa North Airport

 
Drag races were held at the Tulsa North Airport, running the second and fourth Sundays of each month in 1958. Racing began here at least by October 1958 or earlier. On November 2, 1958, Jim Davis from Oklahoma City broke the track record in his Chrysler-powered fuel dragster with a 149 MPH and 9.82 second run. In 1959 and 1960, the Tulsa Timing Association conducted races on the first and third Sundays under NHRA sanction. The Tulsa North Airport was built about 1944 or 1945. It had a single paved runway that was about 3,000 feet long.   Mike Sheehan recalled why drag racing halted at this airport, "The runway was asphalt and the dragsters tore up one end of the runway. The drag races were moved to Browns or another airport.” Sheehan recalls the drag races starting in about 1953-55.
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Vance Air Force Base Drag Strip (Enid)

  • Years of Operation: 1968
 
Drag races were held  on a runway here in at least 1968.  It was listed as one of 325 U.S. drag strips in 1968 published in an issue of the Swedish magazine Start & Strip
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Wheatley Airport Drag Strip (Moore)

 
The Wheatley Airport Drag Strip was advertised for sale in the Oklahoma City Daily Oklahoman (Mar. 23, 1958). It was touted as a "sure money maker." They were including timing equipment and loud speakers in the sale. This tends to lead to the conclusion that drag races may even have been held here as early as 1957, but documentation has not been found to support this.  The airport was located in Moore on the south side of Oklahoma City and was also known as Barkhurst Field. The general aviation airport was established sometime between 1938 and 1945. An oval race track was also built on the site of the airport in the 1950s. There is no visible remnant of the old airport today as the site is covered with industrial buildings. 
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Willow Run Raceway/Oklahoma City International Raceway Park

  • Years of Operation: 1966-early 1970s, 1984-85
  • Status:  3

Larry Gulihur, R. F. Williams, and Raymond Burger filed incoporation papers for Willowrun Raceway on March 10, 1966. James Garner, the actor, may have played a role as an investor in getting the track built. It opened in August 1966, with top fuel racers on hand like Eddie Hill, Fred Rowsey, Bobby Langley, John Griffith, and Mike Sorokin with the Surfers. The track was located on the southwest corner of the intersection of I-40 and Choctaw Road, southeast of Oklahoma City. The track was about 1/8th of a mile west of Choctaw Road, running from southeast to northwest. The track only operated for about five or six years, then closed due to poor attendance.  Doug Waggoner, who tried to revive the track in the 1980s, candidly recounted what really drove the nail in the coffin, saying, "There was a NHRA division 4 points race there and the promoter took off with all the gate receipts and that was the end."  The track reopened in 1970 as Frontier International Raceway, but that was short-lived (see above). After years of sitting idle,  Doug Waggoner tried to get the old track up and running in 1984. He recalled, "I fought the city to get the permits to reopen and spent over $200,000.00 to put it back together again. We were set to put Oklahoma City back on the drag racing map with commitments from NHRA for a WWCS race, a Super Chevy Sunday event, major sponsorship from Coors for a funny car series and much more. The owners had committed up to 1 million dollars for improvements. We staged a big race to show them the potential and they said go. Unfortunately they got cold feet and backed out in 1985. Very sad and devastating for me. NHRA really wanted this to happen also." Waggoner wrote that "greed from the ownership group . . . killed my effort."  Today the site of the drag strip is a housing development. The developer tore up the old tarmac.
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Willow Run Raceway, 1969 ​​​​​ aerial photo

Woodring Municipal Airport (Enid)


Enid was the first city in Oklahoma to build a municipal airport, dating back to 1928. There was a drag race held on its runway on August 28, 1960. Another race was held on Sunday March 26, 1961. Jack Thrasher of Arkansas City took top eliminator in his D dragster. More research is needed. The airport is four miles southeast of Enid.
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Woodward Drag Strip


It was listed as one of 325 U.S. drag strips in 1968 published in an issue of the Swedish magazine Start & Strip .  Races may have been held on a runway of the World War II airport located seven miles west of Woodward, but more research is needed to confirm that. Read Garen Martens' memories of racing there in Memories (Oklahoma) section.
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Woodward Drag Strip, located at 3423 US 412, ​ 1971 topo map