Heading 3

Drag Strip List

A Comprehensive Encyclopedia

HOME
LOCATION
MEMORIES
ABOUT
CONTACT
Huston Platt in the Dixie Twister at 1968 Mid-South Drag Racing Championships. Photographer unknown

GEORGIA

Red's Dragstrip/Southeastern International Dragway (Dallas) (1955)
Atlanta "Drag Strip" (1957)
Camp Wheeler Drag Strip (Macon) (1957)
Thomasville Municipal Airport (1957)
Yellow River Dragstrip (Newton County) (1959)
Ted Edwards Skyway Airport Dragway (Fairburn) (1950s)
​Waynesboro Drag Strip (1950s)
Augusta International Speedway/Dragway (Hephzibah) (1960)
Bainbridge Dragway (1960)
Drag City (Ringgold) (1960)
Newton County Drag Strip/Atlanta Speed Shop Drag Strip (Covington) (1960)
U. S. 19 Dragway (Albany) (1960)
Paradise Drag Strip (Calhoun) (1961)
Forsyth County Drag Strip (Cumming) (1962)
Lloyd's Drag Strip (Blairsville) (1962)
Double H Drag Strip (Blue Ridge) (1963)
13 Forks Dragstrip (Elberton) (1963)
New Brainerd Optimist Drag Strip (Ringgold) (1964)
Vidalia Drag Strip (1964)
Houston County Dragway/Warner Robins Dragway (1965)
Macon Drag Strip (1968)
Savannah Dragway (1968)
Vidalia Drag Strip (1964)
Jefco Drag (Jefferson) (1960s)
Lloyd's Drag Strip (Blairsville) (1960s)
Atlanta International Dragway (Commerce) (1976)
Twiggs County Raceway/Macon National Dragway (Jeffersonville) (1970s)
South Georgia Dragway (Colquitt) (1996)
L & L Dragway/Hinesville Raceway Park (1997)
South
 
125171013
Waynesboro Drag Strip, 1959. Photographer unknown

Atlanta "Drag Strip"

 
There were reportedly two private commercial drag strips in the vicinity of Atlanta outside the city limits. "Old Timer" wrote that the drag strip was on the front straightaway of the Lakewood Speedway at the Lakewood Fairgrounds. More research is needed.
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map

Atlanta International Dragway (Commerce)

  • Years of Operation: 1976-present
 
The track's opening race was the three-day $200,000 IHRA-sanctioned Dixie Nationals held on May 21-23, 1976. Forty thousand people watched the final eliminations on Sunday. In the semi-finals of top fuel, Don Garlits turned 234.98 MPH at 6.06 seconds to beat Pat Dakin for top time of the meet.  Garlits beat Paul Longenecker in the finals to win top fuel. Ray Beadle and Bob Glidden won funny car and pro stock respectively. On September 10-12, 1976, the 30,000-seat dragway hosted the IHRA Nationals. The race was marred on Sunday when an engine of Clayton Harris's top fuel dragster exploded and shrapnel injured ten people in the grandstands. In the finals of top fuel, Don Garlits beat Shirley Muldowney and set a new IHRA speed mark of 5.79 seconds at 241.93 MPH. R. C. Sherman won funny car and Bob Glidden won pro stock. The track's official website has the following brief history of the dragway:  "Atlanta Dragway was built in 1975 by Gene Bennett and originally had been graded out for an airport. The original airport tower served as the original timing tower, and the track direction was the same as the airport without asphalt, just Georgia red clay. In 1980, the track was sold to Norman Pearah and became an NHRA-sanctioned track. Back then, the track was only opened twice a year for major events. The track was purchased in 1987 by Pro Stock driver Gary Brown and partners J.D. Stevens and Rudy Bowen. The track underwent major reconstruction to put in new aluminum grandstand seating, permanent restrooms and rebuilt concession buildings. In 1989, the thirteen year-old track was resurfaced with a concrete launching pad and a new timing system. In addition to the track modification, a reconditioned VIP tower complete with a timing deck, press center and corporate suites was built in 1990. NHRA purchased the track in 1993 and in 1999, it resurfaced the track and added an updated timing system.  The tower restrooms were remodeled and all concession, tower and ticket buildings were rewired. In 2003, the track’s FM radio and public address system were both upgraded.  In 2009, four permanent grandstand sections were added to the existing grandstands.  The entire length of the shutdown area was repaved in 2010, and in 2011 the timing system was once again upgraded to new fiber-optic technology." It continues to operate as an NHRA-sanctioned track today.
CLICK HERE to see narrated video footage of the long-gone Lloyd's Drag Strip, now a residential road, 1:22 minutes
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map

Augusta International Speedway/Dragway (Hephzibah)

 
In 1959 plans were begun for a  large motorsports complex to be constructed thirteen miles southwest of Augusta in Hephzibah.  Augusta International Raceway was the brainchild of Bob Burson, who partnered on the project with Marshall Spray. When the racing plant was finished, it had a road course, quarter-mile drag strip, half-mile paved oval, 1/8th-mile micro track, motocross track, and kart track. An NHRA divisional drag race was held on a finished straight section of the Augusta International Speedway in 1960 (see Hot Rod Magazine, Oct. 1960, p. 39). Races were being held every Sunday throughout 1960. At a drag race held on the speedway on May 7, 1961, Goodman Bare's injected Chevy was one of the dragsters on the program. At a June 18, 1961, drag race on the speedway, Walt Arfons's "Green Monster" jet dragster was the featured attraction during a full program of drag racing. The drag strip, called Augusta Dragway, located on the northernmost part of the complex, running east-west, was completed and ready for racing in January 1962. It was sanctioned by NASCAR. Walt Arfons turned 226 MPH in his jet dragster in its first year of operation. The Georgia State Championship races were held on June 30, 1963. Doyle Stansell was the drag strip director. The raceway complex  operated until 1969, but very little information has been uncovered about the drag strip. More research is needed.
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map
125171013
1993 aerial view of Augusta International Dragway

Bainbridge Dragway

 
The Bainbridge Jaycees likely conducted monthly drag races on a runway at the old Army airfield at Bainbridge Air Base, located just west of the city of Bainbridge. That base was inactivated in 1961. The opening event was held on May 15, 1960. News ads gave its location as on Highway 84 West, which corresponds with the location of the old airfield. Tommy Ivo made exhibition runs in his twin-engine dragster at this Bainbridge Jaycee-sponsored drag race held on July 24, 1960. He was matched against the dual Chrysler-engined dragster of Ken Scott of Selma, Alabama. The Jaycees were going to use the proceeds to erect additional seating at Centennial Field, the football stadium at Bainbridge. As of July 1960, the best mark at the track was a respectable 173.90 MPH. They brought in out-of-state dragsters on occasion to attract spectators. Don Garlits ran there in late 1960, clocking a 204 MPH run that he really thought was bogus. Bainbridge was apparently using timing equipment, as were a few other strips, that weren't reliable at that time.
125171013
May 15, 1960
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map

Camp Wheeler Drag Strip (Macon)

 
Incorporation papers were filed for this drag strip on April 14, 1961, but racing started as early as 1957. Racing took place on a concrete roadway on the former site of the World War II military base. Charles Baker was the owner. On January 16, 1964, Don Nicholson ran 11.24 in his '64 fiberglass A/FX Mercury Comet Marauder station wagon at this track. More research is needed to establish the track's years of operation and exact location. An "Old Timer" thought this track may have closed shortly after Warner Robins opened in 1965. However there is documentation of another track operating in Macon in 1968 (see below).
 
 
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map
125171013
1957

Dalton "Drag Strip"

  • Years of Operation:   ?-?
  • Status:  Exact location unknown
 
There was a dirt-surfaced strip in this Georgia town, just south of Chattanooga, Tennessee. Little is known about it; more research is needed.
 
 
Did you race here? Tell us about it.

Double H Drag Strip (Blue Ridge)

 
Incorporation papers were filed by Roy W. Hembree, the CEO, for this drag strip on December 2, 1963. Brian Lohnes wrote a brief history of this track. Richard McFalls, an archivist of Double H , said that the track had its grand opening race on November 17, 1963. Andrew Wolf dates the drag strip's opening to November 3, 1963, when more than 1,000 people showed up to watch the action. Bill Hembree was a co-owner. The strip was located five miles west of Blue Ridge, Georgia, on Boardtown Road. In May 1965, Double H held a 3-day extravaganza of Super Stock and Factory Experimental racing. Called the Southern World Series of Drag Racing, it was a barnstorming bunch of racers who also put on a show at two other Southern drag strips. Prior to its closing, it was called Lost Mountain Dragstrip. Racing direction was from south to north, with spectators standing/sitting on the small hillside lining the track on the right (East) side. Over time, poor attendance was likely what doomedf the track. The old strip today is a small rural airport runway, called Blue Ridge Skyport Airport.
 
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map
125171013
125171013
125171013
CLICK HERE to see 8mm video footage of Double H Drag Strip, on May 9, 1965, Southern World Series of Drag Racing, video taken by Roy Smith, 2:51 minutes, no sound
1996 aerial view of former site of Double H Drag Strip

Drag City (Ringgold)

 
Located two miles east of Ringgold at the intersection of Highway 41 and Salem Valley Road, the track opened as a 1/5th-mile track. It operated simultaneously and harmoniously with another Ringgold drag strip--Brainard Optimist Drag Strip. In place of a Christmas tree light, Drag City used an old traffic light for several years. Funny car racer Shirl Greer was the track manager for a number of years, promoting some big races, especially in the 1970s. In the later years, the track was sanctioned by the IHRA. It also was called Ringgold Dragway when it was managed by Chuck Heath. After the 1984 season, the track closed and all guardrails, buildings, and timing equipment were removed. The 38-acre site was bought by a church, but they found that the land was prone to flooding so the land remained undeveloped. In 2010, it was being offered for an asking price of $275,000. 
125171013
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map
2009 aerial view of former site of Drag City

Forsyth County Drag Strip (Cumming)

 
Located five miles north of Cumming, this old 1960s-era drag strip is now a housing development.  Sometime between 1980-93, the strip was repurposed as Cumming Airfield, using the 3,200 foot long asphalt drag strip for its runway. According to drag racing historian Bret Kepner the Cumming Airport "is one of those extremely rare examples
of a dragstrip being converted into an airport instead of vice versa.
It was built in 1962 and opened as Forsyth County Drag Strip;
it closed in the late 1960s and was reconfigured into a small airstrip."
Phil Bonner, Jr. recalled, "My dad drove funny cars and landed his airplane at Cumming Dragway as Lamar Sexton was also a friend and owner of the dragstrip." It was called Cummings Drag Strip in a list  of 325 U.S. drag strips in 1968 published in an issue of the Swedish magazine Start & Strip
CLICK HERE to see location on a map
125171013
Forsyth County Drag Strip, 1965 ​ topo map
125171013
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
Forsyth County Drag Strip, 1972 aerial photo
125171013
1999 aerial view of Forsyth County Drag Strip

Hinesville Raceway Park

 
Ray Futch filed incorporation papers for L & L Dragway on August 12, 1996. This 1/8th-mile drag strip was built just on the southwest outskirts of Walthourville adjacent to U.S. Highway 84E. "Old Timer" wrote this website that the "original name was L & L Dragway, because it was close to the county line of Liberty and Long. It opened in 1997 and closed in 2002 due to unfortunate circumstances. The bank that originally financed the track took possession. The sad thing is that a well-known racer tried to buy it from the bank and was turned down."  It looks like it was being dismantled in the 2009 aerial photo.
125171013
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map
Hinesville drag strip, 2007 historic aerial photo

Houston County Dragway/Warner Robins Dragway

 
A $4,000 purse was offered for a 2-day race on June 18-19, 1966. Jimmy Nix was one of the entries. It was touted in ads as the "biggest race ever held in Georgia." On November 5, 1967, Sammy Joe Hood was killed racing his 1965 Barracuda funny car in a match race. He hit a wall going about 150 MPH and spun end over end.  The track ran under NHRA sanction in 1967, if not before, on every first and third Sunday. Troy Shuttlesworth was the track manager in 1967. One old timer used to visit the strip when he was stationed at Robin Air Force Base after his tour at Vietnam. He said, "The track owner was Bobby 'Waterboy' Boyd. He got that nickname because he once had almost an entire season rained out. The funniest thing that I remember was that after the shutdown area, there was a farmer's soybean field. Any car that couldn't get stopped wound up in there. Whenever Radici & Wise ran there, the farmer would sit on his tractor out in that field and wait for Radici. He'd charge 10 bucks to pull him back onto the track. The joke back then was that Radici went into the po'beans so many times, he had bought that old farmer a new tractor." Today's Jerry Barker Drive was the eastern finish and shut-down area of the old track.
 
 
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map
125171013
December 26, 1965
125171013
1993 aerial view of Warner Robins Dragway
CLICK HERE to see video footage of Warner Robins Dragway, January 28, 1990, 1 minute, no sound

Jefco Drag Strip (Jefferson)

 
Little is known about this drag strip, other than it operated and closed in the late 1960s. "Old Timer," the old drag strip researcher, found the drag strip marked on a 1965 topo map. It was just southwest of the Jackson County Airport. It was adjacent to and just north of a half-mile paved oval track, that is just southeast of this airport today. There is a paved strip of road there today that mirrors the location of Jefco Drag Strip. The oval is the old Jefco Speedway, built in 1967, but called Gresham Motorsports Park today. "Old Timer" also thinks this strip may have been one of the strips to close after the Yellow River Drag Strip tragedy in March 1969. After that terrible accident, all drag strips were required to have safety barriers, insurance coverage, and an ambulance on hand. Many tracks couldn't meet these new requirements so had to close. More research is needed. There is a YouTube video that has been linked to 13 Forks Dragstrip online, but there are things in that video that don't ring true for 13 Forks (like an adjacent dirt oval track). It might be footage of the old Jefco strip . We'd invite feedback on this.
 
 
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map
125171013
Clipping (probably 1968) from Gene Cromer's scrapbook. Courtesy of Frank Taylor​

Lloyd's Drag Strip (Blairsville)

 
This was a narrow 1/8th-mile track built by Lloyd Young. When it first opened, it was basically a dirt strip with a 100-foot long concrete starting pad. In 1963, the track was paved for the full length--1,056 feet. There was an uphill shutdown area and a return road near the finish line. Timing was on the primitive side involving stop watches, finish line watchers, and telephones.
 
 
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map
125171013
125171013
125171013
Lloyd's Drag Strip, 1966 ​​​ topo map
CLICK HERE to see narrated video footage of the long-gone Lloyd's Drag Strip, now a residential road, 1:22 minutes​​​​
A​pril 11, 1965​​​
A​pril 11, 1965​​​

Macon Drag Strip

  • Years of Operation:   1968
  • Status:  Exact location unknown
 
This drag strip appeared in a list  of 325 U.S. drag strips in 1968 published in an issue of the Swedish magazine Start & Strip .  See also entry for Camp Wheeler Drag Strip (above).
 
 
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map

New Brainerd Optimist Dragstrip (Ringgold)

  • Years of Operation:   1964-present
 
This drag strip organization relocated from its old track in Hixon, Tennessee, where it had operated for seven years. It began life as a quarter-mile strip, but had to opt for 1/8th-mile in 1976 due to faster cars and Chickamauga Creek at the end of the track. That creek has given the track headaches with its persistent flooding. The track offered class racing through 1981, with bracket racing being added to the program in the 1970s. The track, under IHRA sanction, has undergone recent upgrades to keep it viable in the Chattanooga area market.
 
 
125171013
L​isting in National Dragster, Dec. 23, 1977. Courtesy of Mel Bashore​
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map
CLICK HERE to see video footage of IHRA Modified Eliminator race at Brainerd Optimist Dragstrip, circa 1986-87, 3:57 minutes​​​​

Newton County Drag Strip/Atlanta Speed Shop Dragway (Covington)

 
This strip, called the Hub by some, opened under NHRA sanction at least as early as 1960, or before, east of the town of Covington. Incorporation papers were filed for Newton County Drag Strip on September 3, 1959, so racing might have started in 1959. Races were held on the fourth Sunday of each month.  Late in 1962, Sneaky Pete Robinson defended his Drag News Number 1 spot at this strip against challenger Jack Chrisman. From 1964-72, this strip hosted one of the richest drag racing events in the country--with a $10,000 purse.  The old drag strip is now the main street running through a housing subdivision. Toby Denham gave the following directions:  "The Atlanta Speed Shop track is now called Ewing Road. Take 278 [east] out of Covington. Look for Old Hwy 229 on on the right. Go a mile or two and Ewing is on the left. The old entrance is just before you turn on Ewing (it's overgrown)." It is in today's Mansfield or Social Circle, Georgia.   Terry Ozburn wrote, "I grew up in Newton County on the farm right across the street! How many remember Trent Costley? Mr. Hulon Hodges, who ran the concession stands! The time when what little bleachers we had on the spectator's side fell in and injured some folk? Some of the best drivers in NHRA history has been down that strip!"
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map
125171013
April 24, 1960
125171013
CLICK HERE to see 8mm video footage of the Atlanta Dragway $10,000 race, flimed by Hugh Greeson, 5:37 minutes
125171013
L​isting in ​​National Dragster, Dec. 23, 1977. Courtesy of Mel Bashore
1988 aerial view of Atlanta Speed Shop Dragway

Paradise Drag Strip (Calhoun)

  • Years of Operation: 1961-present
 
Otto Timms built this drag strip in an old cotton field in 1961. In its first year, a horrible accident killed one person and injured ten others. Virginia Quarles, age 23, was driving a car on the strip, with her husband, Frank, as the passenger. Shortly after leaving the line, the car spun out of control and crashed into a crowd of spectators behind a wood and wire fence. Deward Lee Duncan, age 23, from Chatsworth, Georgia, was killed. Frank Quarles said, "We were coming off the line when suddenly the car spun out. We don't know why." The track started as a quarter-mile race track, but as speeds increased, it was scaled back to 1/8th-mile racing, which continues today. The track record (2015) is 4.43 seconds.
 
 
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map
CLICK HERE to see video footage of Paradise Drag Strip in 2012, 1 minute

Red's Dragstrip/Southeastern International Dragway (Dallas)

 
Marvin “Red” Jones opened the track as “Red’s Dragstrip” on July 4, 1955, as documented in a nice 2011 feature article in Dragzine . When this drag strip was first built, the 1,000-foot long track surface was a poor mixture of tar, gravel, and cheap asphalt. Shortly later they turned the original track into the return road and built a better quarter-mile asphalt track next to it. One old timer recalled the staging area, which "had a steep uphill approach to the starting line that required a line-loc or a real good heel and toe driver!"  In 1963, Charles Hardy operated and managed the track. On March 16, 1964, Don Nicholson ran a very quick 11.12 ET in his '64 fiberglass Mercury Comet Marauder station wagon at this strip. One horrible incident in the track's history occurred on February 28, 1965, involving famed stock car champion Richard Petty. He was driving his 1965 Hemi-powered Cuda in a match race against Arnie Beswick. A broken front suspension sent his race car into a crowd of spectators, killing an 8-year-old boy and sending  seven people to the hospital with injuries. Petty was in shock and, devastated, ordered what was left of the crashed car buried on his property so no one would ever have to see it again. In 1966 the track was sanctioned by NHRA. In the 1970s the racing distance was shortened to 1/8th mile because of the increasing speeds of the race cars. In the mid-1990s the track was completely renovated and the racing surface was changed to concrete paving.  Gene Fuller took over as manager and promoter in 1997. The final race was held on December 11, 2005, bringing to a close a half-century of drag racing legacy. The  track was located in Dallas, Georgia, at 1787 East Paulding Drive. In some reports, it was simply called Dallas Drag Strip.
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map
125171013
L​isting in ​​National Dragster, Dec. 23, 1977. Courtesy of Mel Bashore
125171013
1993 aerial view of Dallas Drag Strip
CLICK HERE to see a WAGA-TV story about Southeastern Dragway produced in the late 1990s, produced by Rodney Hall, 2:59 minutes
CLICK HERE to see Super 8mm video footage of Southeastern Dragway in 1968, taken by Hugh Greesom, 3:02 minutes, no sound 

Savannah Dragway

 
This drag strip, located on Highway 17 southwest of Garden City,  opened as a quarter-mile strip in 1968. It was built next to the Savannah Speedway oval track. In the mid-1980s, it changed to an 1/8th-mile strip due to rising insurance costs and safety concerns. At the end of the 2005 season, the track closed for good because the lease expired and because of noise complaints filed by a neighbor. Jeff Harris operated the track from 1999 until it closed. There is a YouTube video that has been linked to 13 Forks Dragstrip online, but there are things in that video that don't ring true for 13 Forks (like an adjacent dirt oval track). It might be footage of the old Savannah Dragway . We'd invite feedback on this.
125171013
L​isting in ​​National Dragster, Dec. 23, 1977. Courtesy of Mel Bashore
125171013
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map
CLICK HERE to see video footage of Savannah Dragway in 2004, 3:54 minutes
2004 aerial view of Savannah Dragway

South Georgia Dragway (Colquitt) 

 
This outlaw 1/8th-mile drag strip was located ten miles east of Colquitt. It was reached by going east on Highway 91, then driving south about 2.5 miles on Johnny Freeman Road. It is still visible on the east side of Johnny Freeman in aerial photos.
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map
125171013
1999 aerial view of South Georgia Dragway, one year after it closed

Ted Edwards Skyway Airport Dragway/Houston Bros. Drag Strip (Fairburn)

 
Born in Maine, Ted Edwards won several national dirt-track motorcycle titles and promoted races at Lakewood Speedway. He established and started drag races at his airstrip in Fairburn. It is recognized as the first permanent drag strip in Georgia. Races were held on the runway at Ted Edwards Airport. Julius Hughes managed the track for Ted in the late 1950s and early 1960s.  An old timer recalled that this "was a small airstrip, raced on Friday, and Saturday nights. before dark. When a plane wanted to land, they would circle the track, and the races would stop for the plane to land, then resume." On Monday, September 6, 1971, two people were slightly injured when their small airplane made a forced landing while a drag race was being held. About one thousand people were watching the race. Another old racer had a few memories of the old track:  "not a hell of a lot of shutdown room." Another old timer recalled, "The sixties were the greatest there. The days of glory, '55 Chevies running modified production, gassers, a few altereds, super stockers, etc. Even saw a jet powered car once. Had to stop the races occasionally to allow a small plane to land or take off." At least by 1968, the name of the track was Houston Bros. Drag Strip.   Another old racer recalled, "I ran there in around '67 till it closed . . . . I would go to Fairburn on Friday-Saturday and on to Dallas on Sunday. I finally got tired and give it up. Used to have to go back on the return road that Houston would put oil down to keep the dust down, but Oscar [Roberts], Jabo Elam, and the Houston Bros. Corvette would come back down the strip itself."  On Monday, September 6, 1971, a thousand people were watching the races when a small plane had to make a forced landing at the strip during the race.  It is possible that the airfield is still extant, but more research is needed to find its location. More research is also needed to find the specific years the track operated. (see also Ed Bernd's Memories )  The strip is today's South Fulton Airport, on the southwest outskirts of Fairburn. A 1983 topo map called it South Fulton Skyport.
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map
125171013
The landing strip is below the oval track in this 1960 ​​ aerial photo
125171013
The landing strip is near the bottom of this 1962 aerial photo

13 Forks Dragstrip 

 
This drag strip was located about a half mile north of the intersection of Thirteen Forks Road and Maple Springs Road in 13 Forks, in what is now a heavily-wooded area. It derived its name from the small community of 13 Forks. It is marked "Drag Strip" on the 1975 topographic map and is easily seen on 1972 historic aerial photographs. The return road was on the north side of the strip and the area was much less wooded than it is today. Research has uncovered little about this drag strip.
125171013
13 Forks Dragstrip, 1972 aerial photo
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map
125171013
125171013
13 Forks Dragstrip, ​ 1975 topo map
125171013
Clippings from Gene Cromer's scrapbook. Courtesy of Frank Taylor​

Thomasville Municipal Airport

 
The Thomasville Dragmasters Association conducted drag races under NASCAR sanction at an old Army airport seven miles northeast of the city on Pavo Road. One of the first (if not the first) race was held on July 14, 1957.  Orman Crabb garnered top eliminator on July 21 with a speed of 93.59 MPH.  Racing was shortlived here as the Thomasville city commissioners halted any further racing on August 18, 1957. However there is documentation of a race in Thomasville in 1960 and 1968.  It was listed as one of 325 U.S. drag strips in 1968 published in an issue of the Swedish magazine Start & Strip .  The airport was built by the city in 1941 and leased to the U. S. Army Air Force for training during World War II.
125171013
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map
August 3, 1958

Twiggs County Raceway/Macon National Dragway ​(Jeffersonville)

  • Years of Operation: 1970s-present
 
Rsearch was unable to find documentation regarding when this strip first began operating, but DSL reader wrote that it has been "operating off and on since at least the 70s. All concrete now and built to modern safety specs. Federal government seized it for a few years as the previous owners went to jail for drug dealing." It apparently opened as Twiggs County Raceway (or Dragway). It operates today without sanction and apparently has always been an outlaw track.
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map
CLICK HERE to see video footage of Twiggs/Macon National Dragway in 2008, 59 seconds

U. S. 19 Dragway ​(Albany)

  • Years of Operation: 1960-present
 
Located about five miles south of Albany, this 1/8th-mile track began operation in late 1960. The first drag race may have been the one held on October 22-23, 1960, featuring Don Garlits and two twin-engined dragsters. In 1964, the track was operated by Bill Connell. They ran races on Saturday nights and Sunday. On occasion, the strip would host feature attractions like Don Nicholson's A/FX Mercury Comet in November 1964. But on most weeks it was "run what you brung." Two deaths have occurred, one in 1977 and the other in 1992. Today the track runs under NHRA sanction.
125171013
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map
October 22-23, 1960
CLICK HERE to see aerial view of U.S. 19 Dragway in 2014, drone photography by Lou Crouch, 33 seconds, no sound 
CLICK HERE to see video footage of an entertaining big-time grudge race at U.S. 19 Dragway in 2013, 8:57 minutes

Vidalia Drag Strip

 
Larry Sams remembers racing at the Vidalia Airport drag strip as early as 1964. Harvey Fountain operated the drag strip, filing incorporation papers for it on August 27, 1969. "Old Timer" wrote that racing took place on a runway of the now still-active Vidalia Municipal Airport. Funds were made available by Georgia Governor Lester Maddox to refurbish the old World War II auxiliary airfield's runways in 1969, improving the racing surface. "Old Timer" wrote, " It was advertised as an eighth-mile strip. It held a lot of pro-stock match races in the early days." One can only speculate why it closed in the mid-1980s.
125171013
L​isting in ​​National Dragster, Dec. 23, 1977. Courtesy of Mel Bashore
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map

Waynesboro Drag Strip

 
A drag strip purportedly operated in Waynesboro in 1959. Photographs taken at races show that it operated on an airfield, undoubtedly today's Burke County Airport, located just south of the town. More research is needed to identify its years of operation and history.
Did you race here? Tell us about it.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map

Yellow River Dragstrip (Newton County)

 
This drag strip opened in about 1959, located between Covington and Conyers, Georgia. On March 8, 1964, Don Nicholson ran an 11.l6 ET in his '64 fiberglass Mercury Comet Marauder station wagon at a Covington, Georgia, track. Any of its history has been overshadowed by the horrific drag race accident, the country's worst racing disaster, that happened here on March 2, 1969. S. R. Campbell was the owner of the strip at that time. The track lacked guard rails. Spectators lined both sides of the track, crowding  the entire length of the narrow strip.  Huston Platt was racing his "Dixie Twister" funny car against Frank Oglesby. Whatever precipitated the accident remains in question, but in the blink of an eye, Platt's car veered off the track before the finish, jumped over a sand embankment, through a wire fence, and  plowed into the crowd lining the track. Eleven people were killed and fifty were injured. The owner had little or no insurance. The strip closed for good after the accident. One old timer who was there on that tragic day recalled, "I was there. Huston Platt"s Dixie Twister Camaro F/C broke an axle (what everybody said) and went into the crowd. There was hardly any crowd control. People were standing 3-5 feet fron the asphalt. I guess out of habit, Huston pulled the chute to maybe bring it back straight. Several people were caught up in the chute. This and the ones standing by the side of the strip that were just run over." Today only the asphalt strip remains, a road in a mobile home community.
CLICK HERE to see location on a map
Did you race here? Tell us about it.