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Ed Lozinski's dragster, from Mesa, at Arizona State Championships in 1955, at the Perryville Airstrip at Goodyear, Arizona. Photo by Garry Smith

ARIZONA

Yuma "Drag Strip" (1952)
Marana Army Air Field (1953)
Gilbert Airstrip (1954)
Perryville (Marsh) Airstrip (1954)
Davis-Monthan Air Force Base (Tucson) (1956)
​Casa Grande Municipal Airport (1957)
Chandler Associated Drag Strip (1958)
Elfrida "Drag Strip" (1958)
Luke Auxiliary Field No. 3 (1958)
Phoenix Associated Drag Strip (1958)
Winslow Airport (1958)
Avra Valley Drag Strip (Tucson) (1959)
Willcox Airport (1959)
Deer Valley Dragway (Phoenix) (1959)
Manzanita Park Speedway (Phoenix) (1961)
Arizona Raceway/Speedworld Raceway Park (Wittman) (1963)
Bee Line Dragway (Scottsdale) (1963)
Phoenix International Raceway (1964)
Tucson Dragway (1964)
 
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Arizona Raceway/Speedworld Raceway Park (Wittman)

 
In June 1961, newspapers throughout the nation announced the plans for a million-dollar racing facility to be built 22 miles northwest of Phoenix. There were to be three tracks: a drag strip, one-mile paved oval, and a 3-mile sports car road course. They were to be built on 577 acres of leased land. The layout of the operation including parking was going to comprise 320 acres of the total. Mel Larson was the president of Arizona Raceway Company, Inc. In November 1962, construction started on the strip. Charles Moneypenny of Daytona Beach was the track designer. He had designed Daytona International Speedway for Bill France. He made the drag strip 80 feet wide and nearly a mile long. The first race on the strip was held on Sunday, January 6, 1963. Top eliminator was won by Performance Products's A/FD with a 179.64 MPH and 8.51 ET. At the 1963 AHRA Winternationals held on February 22-24, fast times were the order of the day on the new track. On the opening day, Bob Sullivan set a track record with a 196.06 MPH and 8.21 ET. But the next day (Feb. 23), Rod Stuckey drove Chris Karamesines' "Chizler" to a blistering world record of 214.78 MPH at 7.81 ET. However he was unable to back up his run to make it official. The track began staging Saturday night drag races on May 4, 1963. From 1964-67, it was call Sportsland Drag Strip and was sanctioned during those years by NHRA. In 1967, Whit Alger was the track manager and races were held on the second and fourth Sundays. In the October 1969 issue of Hot Rod, Mel Larson's Phoenix Dragway was listed as a sanctioned NHRA strip. That year it ran every Sunday, October through April. "Old Timer" notified this website, "Arizona Speedworld has been closed since 2011 due to a dispute between the operator and the State which owns the property. There are concrete barriers lined up the length of the strip to keep people from racing there illegally. It is a bad deal as at the time of its closing it was active four days a week."
 
 
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1963
CLICK HERE to see video footage of Southwest Nostalgia Drags at Arizona Speedworld, Dec. 4, 2011, 7:03 minutes
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2005 aerial view of Phoenix Raceway Park

Avra Valley Drag Strip (Tucson)

  • Years of Operation: 1959
  • Status:  Exact location unknown

Located on Avra Valley Road, a short distance off the Casa Grande Highway, this drag strip had its grand opening on September 13, 1959. It was about five miles outside of Tucson. Unfortunately no documentation other than the reported announcement of the grand opening has been found. The racing undoubtedly took place at what is today the Marana Regional Airport.
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Bee Line Dragway (Scottsdale)


On July 20, 1963, ground was broken for a drag strip to be built on the Salt River Indian Reservation. Jim Rodgers, national 1962 C/S drag champ, built the track on eighty acres of land leased for ten years from the Salt River Pima Indian tribe.  Directions to the track were given as being four miles north of the McDowell Road on Arizona Highway 87. It was a 60-foot wide quarter-mile asphalt strip, with seating for 2,000 people, and a pit area to accomodate 300 cars. It opened for every-week Sunday racing on October 6, 1963, under AHRA sanction. On November 24, 1963, Bob Sullivan from Kansas City, set a new low track ET record of 7.97 in his "Pandemonium IV" A/FD.  The 1964 AHRA Winter Nationals was held at Bee Line. Art Malone turned low ET of the meet with an 8.03 run, but top eliminator was won by Ron Goodsell driving Bob Sullivan's "Pandemonium V" fuel dragster. Bee Line hosted the AHRA Winter Nationals again in 1965 (see Memories ) and for the next several years.  In 1968, the AHRA Winter Nationals was split between Bee Line and Lions Drag Strip on two successive weekends, a first in the history of the event. The race was split because the race had simply gotten too big to just be held at Bee Line.  In 1967, 1,400 cars and 40,000 spectators had attended the Bee Line Winter Nationals.
CLICK HERE to see 8mm video footage of Bee Line, 1963-64, film courtesy of Thomas Clement, 10:45 minutes, music only/no sound
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CLICK HERE to listen to old radio promotional ad for Bee Line Dragway, pan to 4:35 minute mark to hear it
CLICK HERE to see a video of 1965 AHRA Winternationals at Bee Line, 19 minutes
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Advertisement in Drag News, Jan. 12, 1967. Courtesy of Mel Bashore

Casa Grande Municipal Airport

 
In January 1957, the Karb Kats car club received permission from the Casa Grande city council to use an airstrip for quarter-mile drag races at the city-owned municipal airport located five miles north of town. In February 1957, the NHRA sanctioned the drag strip operated by the Casa Grande Timing Association at the airport. The first of the monthly races was held on February 10, attracting over 1,000 people and 89 entries. Carl Grimes won A/A in his Buick-powered Fiat. Johnny Loper took D/G in his '52 Olds at a speed of 92 MPH. Top eliminator was garnered by the Bardelli-Groves-Sandy fuel-injected dragster with a speed of 130 MPH.  With the success of the first race, the club repaved the quarter-mile strip including an additional 300 feet after the quarter-mile mark, with an additional 1,000 feet of graded dirt for shutdown in time for its next race on March 10. This provided a total racing strip of almost a mile. That additional length attracted 14 pre-entered dragsters. With 103 total entries, Carl Grimes clocked the fastest speed of 125 MPH in his Fiat driven by Lloyd Haugh. Before the race on May 12, 1957, hot rod clubs from Chandler joined with the Karb Kats in a racing organization called the Casa Grande Valley Timing Association. The Chandler clubs included the Gents, Modifiers, and Pagans. A new track record was set on July 14, 1957, with a run of 139.25 MPH by a Chrysler-engined dragster sponsored by The Lords, a Tucson club. On Sunday, February 9, 1958, the Karb Kats conducted what they deemed to be the first annual race, celebrating the first anniversary of racing at the airport strip. The top eliminator of the meet was an A Dragster of Cox, Turk & Franks from Mesa. They clocked 114.29 MPH. The meet attracted more than 500 spectators and a field of 81 entries. Johnny Loper won B/G with a speed of 89 MPH. The meet scheduled for March 9, 1958, was billed as the South Central Arizona Championships. It was conducted by the Casa Grande Timing Association. $50 was awarded to the top eliminator and $25 for the fastest time, with trophies awarded to all class winners. At the race on April 13, 1958, Carl Grimes and Louis Rogers's Buick-powered Fiat A/Altered took top eliminator with a run of 121.13 MPH. The last race for which documentation was found happened on August 10, 1958, in which Art Meek took top eliminator with an A Compression class vehicle. Al Eshenbaugh won the C dragster class.  It attracted 50 entries and 150 spectators in that 15th monthly meeting. With the opening of the strip in Chandler, racing may have concluded because so many racers went to the Chandler strip, but that is just speculation.
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Articles of Incorporation of Karb Kats, Inc., March 18, 1957, printed in Casa Grande Dispatch, Mar. 28, 1957

Chandler Associated Drag Strip

 
The Modifiers, Inc. car club received permission from Williams Air Force Base to conduct drag races on a 10,000-foot airstrip located three miles southwest of Chandler on Ocatilla Road. This old airstrip was built during World War II and was known as Williams Auxiliary Airfield No. 6. It was also called Goodyear Air Force Auxiliary Airfield. It had two paved 5,500-foot runways. The primary runway oriented northwest/southeast was lengthened to over 8,000 feet between 1952-56. Some time after 1966, it became a civilian airfield, thereafter being known as Chandler Memorial Airfield (or Gila River Memorial Airport. The opening race was held on March 23, 1958. On April 27, Odie Garrand and Larry Steinegger garnered top eliminator honors in their Buick-powered A/D with a run of 131.38 MPH.  The last race was held on July 26 before halting during the summer months. Before resuming racing on September 28, the runway received a new asphalt surface. With this new surface, they presumably decided to begin anew by re-establishing track records. They awarded trophies in thirty-four classes and ran every fourth Sunday. The Valley Timing Association conducted the races. On October 12, Bill Hopper improved upon his earlier track record in his Chrysler-powered Fiat A/A with a 10.63 ET and 137.40 MPH. Jack Schnepf of Chandler broke the track mark for A/R with a run of 130.24 MPH on October 26. On November 30, 1958, cam grinder Howard Johansen in the Howard Cam Special dragster powered by two Corvette engines, set a new world mark of 9.3 seconds. The last drag race at the Chandler strip was held on July 25, 1959. The Air Force ordered that the airstrip could henceforth only be used for military purposes. There were several attempts to redevelop the airfield, but it sits idle now (2015) and is closed.
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July 25, 1959

Davis-Monthan Air Force Base (Tucson)

 
After a four-year absence, the Jaycees worked to bring supervised drag racing back to Tucson in 1956. On April 29, 1956, the first race was held on a runway at the air base. Twenty-three trophies were awarded to class winners, with over a hundred entered. It was sanctioned by the NHRA and followed with weekly racing conducted by the Tucson Timing Association. In 1957 they conducted monthly races. Emory Cook ran 155 MPH to take top eliminator at the June 17, 1957 race before 5,000 spectators. On August 17, 1958, Red Greth ran 154.25 MPH in the Fisher-Greth Tucson Service Station Supply roadster. In a special match race, Greth was matched against Bob Huebner's jalopy coupe. The jalopy crossed the starting line doing 90 MPH while Greth started from a standing stop. Huebner only beat Greth's roadster by a car length at the finish. On September 21, 1958, a Chrysler-powered dragster sponsored by Service Station Supply took top eliminator honors with a clocking of 157 MPH before 800 spectators. On November 15, 1959, Chris Karamesines broke the strip record with a run of 174 MPH in 8.39 seconds. On March 27, 1960, Red Greth set an unofficial world record of 8.03 seconds, but he was unable to back it up within 2 percent. On October 30, 1960, 1,300 people attended the NHRA Southwest Regional drag races. Fred Dobney and The Strollers split the top eliminator honors. Top speed was 176.64 MPH with a 9.51 ET. On November 19, 1961, Red Greth set a new track record in his "Speed Sport III" roadster with a run of 174.03 MPH. On June 17, 1962, prior to setting out on a national tour, the Fisher-Greth "Speed Sport IV" turbine-powered dragster set a new track ET record of 8.75 at 161.98 MPH. Monthly racing halted in March 1963 because the Air Force began storing surplus B-47 jet bombers on the runway where races had been held. The Air Force had also objected to admission being charged. That ended drag racing at the air base.
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June 15-16, 1957
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Deer Valley Dragway (Phoenix)

 
This drag strip was located on the runway of Deer Valley Airport, at the end of 19th Avenue and Deer Valley Road, north of Phoenix's North Mountain.  The Deer Valley Airport is still there today. Newspapers reported that in July 1959, its runway was being extended and the final 3/4 mile was being smooth-surfaced. Grandstands were being built and lights put in for night racing.  When completed the 75-foot wide track measured 5,000 feet of concrete asphalt surface with 1,500 feet of smoothed dirt over-run. It is not known when the track was first operating, but on June 5, 1960, Raymond Ferry, age 23, was badly injured when his dragster spun out of control going 182 MPH at this racing strip. Night racing was being held as early as July 30, 1960. They conducted a weekly racing program every Saturday. Drag racer Jack Schnepf was the NHRA-sanctioned strip's promoter. Improved lighting was ready for the race on August 20, 1960. They had also moved the spectator area to be closer to the drag strip. Fuel cars were required to have a parachute and not exceed 150 MPH. A set of penalties were put in place for any who exceeded that speed restriction. However these speed restrictions were apparently no longer in force because dragsters were trying to beat the Arizona speed mark of 182 MPH at the race held on October 16, 1960. The track had also started racing on Sunday. In 1961, the promoter was O. H. Bender, who had previously promoted drag racing in Las Vegas and Pomona. Sunday racing started up on March 19, with a $100 bond offered for top elinminator. On April 2, Gary Cagle's 175-MPH fuel dragster was one of the cars entered in the racing. On April 30, the Fisher-Greth Speed Sport Special made runs on the strip. That may have been the final drag race at the airport. Competition with  the Phoenix Drag Strip northwest of Peoria that also operated in 1961 is probably what killed racing at Deer Valley.  
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Elfrida "Drag Strip"

 
On August 24, 1958, the Highway Saints Drag Club sponsored a race on an old abandoned airstrip located six miles due north of Elfrida and just west of what  was then Highway 666 (now U. S. Highway 191). It is barely visible in today's satellite aerial photos. They featured an exhibition race between two youngsters driving Micro Midgets. In October 1958, a scheduled Sunday race at the same location was rained out, but rescheduled for October 12.
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1996 aerial view of the old airfield north of Elfrida where drag races were held in 1958

Gilbert Airstrip


The Drag'ns Car Club invited people to watch their drag races on February 7 at the Gilbert Airstrip, located southeast of Mesa.  That is the first documented race, but there may have been earlier races. It was supervised by the State Highway Patrol.  Merchants donated prizes to the winners. Before another race on July 4, the Drag'ns joined with another area car club to form the Southwest Timing Association.  They obtained insurance from NHRA and obtained photo-electric timers. The airstrip used for drag racing was probably Gilbert Auxiliary Army Airfield #1, constructed between 1937-43, having two 4,000-foot runways and a connecting taxiway on the east side. It was located a half-mile east of Superstition Springs Mall, with no remnants of the airstrip visible any longer.
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1971 aerial view of the old airfield shows that the southernmost part of the airfield had been mostly obliterated by a golf course and trailer park
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2005 aerial view of the site of the old airfield, drawn by Chris Kennedy. The intersection of the two runways was a few hundred yards west of where Costco is today

Luke Auxiliary Field No. 3

 
Top Speed Magazine reported that the Kluster Busters car club held weekly drag races at this airfield in 1952. The longest of four runways was a 3,800 foot paved strip. In 1958, after being prohibited from conducting any more drag races at Perryville, the Southwest Timing Association got permission to use Auxiliary Field No. 3. It was just off Grand Avenue, twenty-two miles northwest of Phoenix. The Auxiliary Field was in the process of being sold to local government by the federal government. Although negotiations for the transfer were still taking place, the racers were given permission to hold races at this field. There was water and electrical facilities. It was located 3/4 of a mile south of Grand Avenue on Litchfield Road.
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Manzanita Park Speedway (Phoenix)

 
This half-mile dirt oval track was built in 1954 on the site of what was originally a dog-racing track. It was located in the southwest part of Phoenix at 35th Avenue and West Broadway. They began a Saturday night drag racing program on about June 10, 1961. It may have been a short-lived experiment that was halted after only a race or two. The race track was closed and sold in 2009 and has been demolished.
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CLICK HERE to see a touching TV report on the final oval track race in 2009
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2002 aerial view of Manzanita Park Speedwy

Marana Army Air Field

 
Sanctioned and supervised by the Arizona Highway Patrol, drag races were held on the Marana Army Air Field (now Pinal Airpark) at least as early as 1953 (and possibly earlier). Dave Smith attended what he remembers as the first race at Marana. He thought it might have been in 1952. Read his recollections in Memories (Arizona).  News reports of a race held on March 8, 1953, stated that they were using a new set of rules and had expanded awarding trophies in ten different classes for cars and motorcycles. The wording of the article implies that drag races had been held previous to that date (possibly in 1952). But drag races were certainly held on a monthly basis in 1953.  On January 3, 1954, the Outcasts Car Club staged a cerebral palsy benefit drag race on the main landing runway. There was no charge for general admission, but entry fees were charged to competitors to cover the costs of timing and trophies. The first race in 1958 occurred on October 11 with night racing under the lights. Carl Grimes was shooting for top eliminator honors on December 14, 1958 in his B dragster. Not only was Marana the oldest drag venue in Arizona, but in 1959, they were the only night-drag racing venue in Arizona. They held events on the second and fourth Saturdays of each month. However in June 1959, strip operator Larry Naughton said that the CAA had ordered him to shut down because Marana was an emergency aircraft landing field. Naughton was hopeful that he could get clearance and reverse their decision.
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October 25, 1958
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Perryville (Marsh) Airstrip

 
The Southwest Timing Association began holding monthly drag races at the Perryville Airstrip, a Luke Air Base auxiliary landing field, at least as early as late 1954. News reports always gave directions to the airstrip as being nine miles west of the Goodyear Naval Air Facility. In April 1955, the Perryville drag racing program was sanctioned by the NHRA. This airstrip became important in drag racing history because, through a fluke of weather, it was the site where NHRA crowned its first national champion. The first NHRA national championship drag races were held in Great Bend, Kansas, in 1955. Unfortunately the final day of those races were rained out. The Southwest Regional Championship had been scheduled to be held two months later at Perryville. So NHRA decided to have the qualified racers finish the rained-out race at Perryville on November 19-20, 1955. Calvin Rice, from Santa Ana, California, became NHRA's first national champion with his flathead Mercury dragster at Perryville. NHRA officials were pleased with the weather at that race, but thought its remote distance from Phoenix was not conducive to holding future national meets.  They leaned toward having a more central location nationally. Six thousand spectators attended the final day of racing. They also saw Ed Losinski clock the fastest speed of the meet and an Arizona drag racing record for single engine cars with a 151.77 MPH blast in his Chrysler-powered dragster.  On November 3-4, 1956, the airport hosted a two-day Arizona state championship event. Red Greth and Lyle Fisher got the Lords Club's dragster to best the track record with a 142 MPH run. Carl Grimes set a national record in his A/Altered coupe with a run of 120.83 MPH. On the December 2, 1956 meet at Perryville, he upped it to 122.45 MPH. On April 14, 1957, Emory Cook set a new track record with a run of 163.63 MPH.  Bud Sampson also set a national record for single-engine A gas dragsters with a run of 150.86 MPH. The car was out of Phoenix and Lefty Mudersbach worked his magic on that car. On the December 29, 1957 meet, the Lords Club's Modified entry garnered top eliminator and top speed with a run of 152 MPH. Jack Moss had the fastest gas time with 144 MPH, but the Dillon-Mudersbach team took top gas eliminator with their A/OG Olds, clocking 143.50 MPH. The Masters Dragliner from Oceanside, California, won C/OG with a record breaking 128.87 MPH. The Southwest Timing Association received word that the event they hoped to hold on March 30, 1958, was cancelled by order of the commander of Luke Air Force Base. That order prohibited them from holding any further drag race events on the Perryville strip. The commander said that the Timing Association had not lived up to the agreement made whien the drag strip was organized in 1954. He contended that they had not cleaned up or repaired damages after the drag races. This came as a surprise because the Timing Association thought they had done a good job cleaning up and repairing any damages, but the order of the commander was final. This ended racing at Perryville. 
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1955
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Phoenix Associated Drag Strip

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The Marauders car club of Phoenix was awarded the lease to operate the new strip in late 1958. This was Luke Auxiliary Field No. 3 (see above), ownership of which had been transferred from the military to the city of Phoenix. Newspapers gave directions to the strip as being twenty-two miles northwest of Phoenix and a quarter mile south of Grand Avenue on Litchfield Road. The first race was scheduled for December 14, 1958, with trophies to be awarded to 34 classes.It was referred to as the Marauders Associated Drag Strip at first, but by early 1959 it was called the Phoenix Associated Drag Strip.  In January 1959, they repaved the strip. But the strip was plagued with management problems. Strip manager Jim Sillett announced that he was quitting in May, reportedly because of the danger to spectators during races. But it was subsequently learned that NHRA was voiding the strip's insurance policy. And shortly afterwards, Sillett filed for bankruptcy and racing stopped at the strip. In July 1959, drag racing promoter George Husky sought permission from the Phoenix city council to sub-lease the strip and resume racing. He said that he wanted to install lights for night racing. The council gave its approval for a lease fee of $150 per month plus a percentage of any profits. Racing was resumed under the management of the Arizona Timing Associatiion including putting on a 2-day event in October. Ted Cyr and Bill Hopper won the 2-day Arizona State Championship on December 6, 1959 with a run of 171.75 MPH in 9.20 seconds. In August 1960, the strip started hosting Go-Kart drag races every first and third Saturday nights. Mel Larson was the strip promoter from about 1960-62. He appointed Bill Costianes to be the track manager late in 1960. In Hot Rod's NHRA track listings, this track was listed as being located in El Mirage. They were running on the second and fourth Saturday nights up until spring 1961, when they switched over to the second and fourth Sundays. In mid-1961, Mel Larson offered a $50 bond to anyone who could break the track record of 176.12 MPH. In 1962, the track record was 178.78 MPH set by Steinegger & Eshenbaugh. On July 23, 1961, Walt Arfons's "Green Monster" turned 8.58 seconds. The strip was located west of the town of Surprise. The town's recreation complex has taken over the western side of the former airfield. Three of the runways are overgrown with vegetation and the paving has been torn up, but the layout of the airfield is still visible in aerial photos.
April 19, 1959
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Phoenix International Raceway

 
Construction started in September 1963 on a racing plant on the outskirts of, what is today, Avondale. Richard P. "Dick" Hogue, a Phoenix developer and businessman, was the builder and owner of this $750,000 multi-purpose racing complex. It included a road course, a paved oval, and a 3,000-foot drag strip. The drag racing portion was  seventy feet wide, with paved fire-up and return lanes. It had an infinite shutdown area as it blended in with the closed mile oval. Plans for the project included  installing full strip lighting for night programs, but they weren't purchased or installed until May 1965. Bill Costianes was appointed to be the director for drag racing. The first formal race at the complex was a drag race held on Sunday, January 12, 1964. But the grand opening of the drag strip was a two-day affair held on February 29 and March 1, 1964. With $7,500 in prize money, it attracted a good field including Jimmy Nix and Chris Karamesines. On the opening day, Connie Kalitta had the fastest run with a 187 MPH at 8.12 seconds.On July 11, 1965, the strip began a program of Sunday night drag racing. The Steinegger-Eshenbaugh A/FD set a track record of 194.80 MPH at the opening Sunday race. The Speed Sport fueler turned 7.65 seconds to set the track's ET record. The track regularly drew about 150 cars each week. On August 22, 1965, a seventeen-year-old high school racer, Phil Miner, was killed when his dragster cartwheeled off the track at 160 MPH. Apparently a drag race program operated for only two years. However it was listed as one of 325 U.S. drag strips in 1968 in an issue of the Swedish magazine Start & Strip .
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July 18, 1965
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1992 aerial view of PIR. Note the road labeled W. Dragstrip Road, just west of where the drag strip was situated.

Tucson Dragway

 
On May 22, 1962, the board of supervisors approved an application for M. M. Sundt Construction Company to build a drag strip on the southeast corner of Houghton Road and Valencia Road. The track was built on land leased from the state and financed by stockholders on the northeast corner of Valencia and Houghton. The stockholders (with percentage of ownership) included Fred Fisher (52%), Lyle Fisher (4%), W. Shelley Richey (4%), William E. Naumann (4%), and M. M. Sundt Construction (10%). The track opened for its first race on April 12, 1964, under AHRA sanction. The grand opening race on April 19 was attended by 6,000 people. At that race, Jimmy Nix set a world record in his S/FX Dodge Charger with a 135.33 MPH clocking. Lyle Fisher and Red Greth took took top fuel eliminator at 193.66 MPH on April 26, 1964. Newspaper editorials and letters to the editor decried the strip's request in 1964 for a liquor license to sell beer at the strip. In May 1964, the strip withdrew its application for a liquor license. Fred Fisher said the track never intended to sell beer. They only applied for the license to prevent someone from opening a tavern near the strip.  The strip purportedly closed after staging the 1985 AHRA Winternationals because the strip was being used by airplanes smuggling illegal drugs. Remnants of the track are still visible in aerial photos.
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May 9, 1964
CLICK HERE to see 8mm video footage of Tucson Dragway, 1960s, 3:20 minutes, no sound
CLICK HERE to see 8mm video footage of Tucson Dragway, 1983 AHRA Winternationals, 47 seconds
CLICK HERE to see 8mm video footage of Evel Knievel making a motorcycle jump at Tucson Dragway, January 23, 1972, 5:51 minutes, no sound

Willcox Airport

 
The Southwestern Arizona Timing Association conducted drag races at the airport on the first Sunday of the month in 1959. One race was held on April 5, 1959. The airport was two miles west of the city. Research could not find races being held there other than in 1959. The airfield appears to be an old World War II airstrip, no longer in use today.
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Winslow Municipal Airport

 
On March 18, 1958, the Winslow city council approved entering into an agreement with the Winslow Renegades Drag Club to allow the club to use the access road and taxi strip at the airport for a drag strip. On May 17, 1959, races were held on the 5,700 foot long track. Duane Miller was the manager of the races. Races were generally held on the third Sunday of the month in 1959. The Northern Arizona Championship drag races were held at Winslow on May 7-8, 1960.
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Listing in National Dragster, Dec. 23, 1977. Courtesy of Mel Bashore

Yuma "Drag Strip"

 
Drag races first started being held in about 1952 at an abandoned WWII emergency airstrip located fifteen miles east of Yuma. The "Dragsters of Yuma" car club conducted the racing, which was approved by the Bureau of Reclamation. The fastest speed recorded by club members was 79 MPH as of early 1953. In 1956, the Barons hot rod club conducted races on a new drag strip located just south of Highway 80, east of Yuma. There is confusion about its exact location, with different newspaper articles stating it was eight miles from Yuma, and other articles giving its distance as twelve or fifteen miles. But later news articles attested that it was at milepost fifteen and a mile distant from the highway. Their first race was held on May 27, 1956. They held a race in September, attracting racers from Arizona and California. Spectators were charged 75 cents for admission. Races were also held on October 14 and December 9, 1956. The first race in 1957 was held on May 12, the second on June 23. Racing in early 1957 was sponsored by the Tri-Valley Timing Association with the strip being sanctioned by the NHRA. In about October 1957, the timing association was reorganized and called the Yuma Timing Association. Races were held monthly. On January 12, 1958, the Yuma Timing Association sponsored a race that drew 545 people to see 72 entries, with Carl Grimes garnering top eliminator. Grimes had top time with a run of 125.34 MPH in his Buick-powered Fiat from Phoenix. It was a benefit race with the strip donating $200 to the March of Dimes. Russell Byrd, Jr. was the strip manager.
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